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The Vine

Jun 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Cantiga Wineworks 2003 Herbert Vineyard Zinfandel I look high and low for special and unusual wines for my monthly review. So, considering that most of the wines made in the foothills are from small, family owned wineries, there are a few handcrafted and small batch wines that fit my criteria for uniqueness. The Cantiga Wineworks 2003 Herbert Vineyard Zinfandel, with fruit from the famous and historic Herbert Vineyard in Fairplay, is one such wine. Winemakers Christine and Rich Rorden make wines in the old-world style, allowing the wines to develop with minimal intervention over time to avoid malolactic fermentation. Zinfandel from the foothills is usually big and jammy, but that's not the case here. This zin’ is a beautifully-balanced food wine, similar to a sangiovese in body and appearance, with a subtle spice on the palette and some fresh berry in the nose. Rich Borden recommends enjoying this wine with roasted pork, chicken or venison, and to serve it with dishes that include sun-dried tomatoes, kalamata olives, rich tomato-based barbecue sauces or savory plum sauces and glazes. I love this wine for a change of pace, and I’m sure that you will too! — Russell ReyesRuss is a freelance writer who also hosts private wine tours and the monthly Dolce Vino University in Cameron Park.For more wine reviews, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Dreamy Droptops

Jun 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Today’s automotive landscape is filled with convertibles, making it easy for almost any budget to afford a slice of joy. While it would be fun to bookend this comparison with the least expensive (Smart for Two) and the most expensive (Rolls-Royce Phantom Drophead Coupe) ragtops in the world, the gap would be Grand Canyon-esque. So, we decided to focus on center stage: enjoyable, useful convertibles that aren’t too expensive, yet a cut above the norm. Jaguar XKJaguar has been associated with sporting cars even before they were called Jaguar. Through motoring history, Jag produced some of the quickest, fastest, most agile, and beautiful cars ever. The XK does wonders to carry on that tradition. The shape recalls the exciting E-Type sports cars of the 1960s and ‘70s, often referred to as one of the most beautiful car designs ever, while maintaining its own identity. Inside, exceptionally well-appointed interiors engulf occupants and surround them with safety, comfort, and the warmth that British cars are so well known for. Bolster that with performance ranging from exceptional to breathtaking, and the XK is a tough ride to beat. Absolutely the priciest car in this lineup, capable of striking the checkbook for just under $100,000, the XK is one of those vehicles that borders on hedonism. It sports a 4.2-liter V8, normally aspirated with 300 horsepower or supercharged with 420 horsepower, both fed through a silky-smooth 6-speed automatic. Opting for the more powerful of the two enters you into the realm of the XKR, lending not only more power, but also a heftier set of brakes, sportier suspension, and stickier tires – just to name a few adjustments that separate it from the regular XK. If there is such a thing as a regular XK. And if you’re seeking some more individual attention, you can tailor it to your exact specifications. Inside, Jaguar will trim with light or dark wood veneers, or ditch the forest look altogether and choose a patterned aluminum trim, again reflecting the original E-Types. While Jaguar has always prided itself with wonderful leathers, it’s the range of colors and combinations that truly mark Jaguar as one of the quintessential luxury carmakers. Even the heavily insulated convertible top is available in a variety of colors. For more hot convertibles, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Jeepers Jamboree

Jun 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Taking a detour off-road (pun intended) from the usual and heading into some new territory, it’s a perfect time this month to take a look at two historical points of interest. One is an event that, while it isn’t exactly gold rush era history, is historical nonetheless. The other is the very trail upon which the aforementioned event takes place. The Jeepers Jamboree is perhaps one of the most well known off-road events of its kind. Off-road enthusiasts and newcomers alike participate in 17 miles of torturous trail that is not for the weak of heart (or mind). This year, the Jamboree will be tackling the Rubicon Trail during the last week of July for the 56th time since its inception. Here upon this trail is where history collides. The Jamboree is a bit of a historical upstart, as it was conceived back in 1952 by a group of men from Georgetown who were seeking to increase the economy in the Georgetown Divide area. From that beginning, 53 vehicles and 155 driving enthusiasts sought to better their community while having a good time. The Jamboree has flourished into an event that has seen roughly 100,000 people and close to 35,000 vehicles over the Rubicon Trail.The Rubicon Trail itself has a truly ancient beginning. The Maidu-Nisenan tribe and the Washoe tribe utilized the Rubicon Valley, from which the trail derives its name, as a meeting place for trading with one another. Both the Maidu-Nisenan and the Washoe occupied most of the area that the Rubicon Trail covers at varying intervals. Many similar trails crossed through the area, mostly used by the Maidu-Nisenan, and provided access and travel to other areas. Moving on in time, shortly after gold was discovered at Sutter’s Mill in 1848, the communities that would later be named Georgetown, Coloma, and Placerville, were founded. The area became flooded with prospectors, trappers, and all manner of folks seeking a grab of land. Rubicon Springs was discovered by these folk in the 1850s, and by 1859 regular foot, horse and wagon traffic passed through the area. From the 1860s onward, both the springs and the valley saw the coming and going of various entrepreneurs, each seeking their own means of livelihood by making money off the land, and those who would pay to come and see it. From the 1880s and into the 1940s the Rubicon Trail was used to move livestock through the Sierras to the western shore of Lake Tahoe for summer grazing, while later residents of the area used it for hunting and fishing. History is not without its sense of irony it seems as fishing and hunting were the same activities that the Maidu had done in the area countless years before the incursion of settlers. Today, the Rubicon Trail is traveled for the Jeepers Jamboree and various other events, and the Rubicon Valley still receives visitors, though the trappers, prospectors and indigenous people have long since left. So it is that these two particular histories have converged with one another, much like the meeting and joining of two trails. The 56th Annual Jeepers Jamboree is set for July 24-27. To register for the event or for more information, visit <a href="http://www.jeepersjamboree.com" target="_blank">jeepersjamboree.com</a>.

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Get To Know...

Jun 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Placerville resident Normadene Carpenter has greatly influenced her community over the years. She founded the Marble Valley Regional Center for the Arts in 1978, and over the past 30 years, she has served as board member, past president, and volunteer office manager. Carpenter has also been involved with the Friends of the Library of El Dorado County, El Dorado County Community Concerts Association, Progress House, El Dorado Arts Council, the American Heart Association, Golden Empire Health Planning Council and the California Epsilon and Sigma Rho Pi Units of the National Association of Parliamentarians. She also served as emeritus member of the California State Association for Medical Laboratory Technology and as president of the Placerville branch of the AAUW. She has been the recipient of many awards including the Spirit of El Dorado, Philanthropy Award of the National Association of Fund Raising Executives, and various community service awards from the El Dorado County and Cameron Park/Shingle Springs Chamber of Commerce, Soroptimist International of Placerville, and the Placerville Branch American Association of University of Women. She is registered with the National Association of parliamentarians and assists various regional and national organizations. Carpenter graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and is a retired Public Health Microbiologist and Clinical Laboratory Scientist. It’s clear that Normadene is dedicated to her work and her community, and for this she’s an inspiration to all!— Heather GrubbFor more on Normadene Carpenter, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Dreamy Droptops

Jun 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Today’s automotive landscape is filled with convertibles, making it easy for almost any budget to afford a slice of joy. While it would be fun to bookend this comparison with the least expensive (Smart for Two) and the most expensive (Rolls-Royce Phantom Drophead Coupe) ragtops in the world, the gap would be Grand Canyon-esque. So, we decided to focus on center stage: enjoyable, useful convertibles that aren’t too expensive, yet a cut above the norm.Volkswagen EosVW’s newish Eos convertible is one of those cars that comes along once in a blue moon, and it aims to please. Standard with the power retractable hardtop that’s so popular in today’s marketplace, VW presses the envelope a little more with a power moonroof, lending just that much more sky when you need it. Available heated seats will make topless driving in cooler weather more enjoyable, while its stiff body, compliant chassis and peppy engine encourages spirited driving.The Eos is available in four trim levels, each building on the previous one to up the ante, starting at about $30,000. All but one are equipped with the 2.0-liter, inline four-cylinder engine good for 200 horsepower, while a 250 horsepower 3.2-liter V6, called VR6, is available to satisfy the appetites of the power hungry. The VR6 is also the best-equipped car, and priced at about $40,000. While you might scoff at the idea of a $40,000 Volkswagen, keep in mind that few cars offer the number of features, level of quality, performance, comfort, style and dependability that VW delivers at that price mark. Also, pretensions run shallow with VW. People will be inclined to think you paid much less for it, thus disarming many IRS agents or touchy clients you might have in your business circles. To them, it’s a cute, fun convertible that anyone can probably afford. Maybe it’s just a smart convertible.For more hot convertibles, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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