Skip to main content

Style Magazine

In-Print

Last Updated: Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Thai Paradise

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

Folsom’s Thai Paradise is a bright and inviting restaurant with a marvelous staff. Once you are seated, you instantly feel like an honored guest – your every dining wish is catered to. Paul Sainoi, manager of Thai Paradise gave Style some insight into the philosophy behind the wonderful food that they serve. Sainoi manages Thai Paradise and his sister Jarunee Fleming is the chef. Cooking runs in their family – Fleming has even cooked for Thai royalty. Royalty, perhaps, but when you go to Thai Paradise, you are visiting family – a family that is passionate about food and honoring their guests, which is exactly the feeling you get while dining with Fleming and her staff. The chefs at Thai Paradise have worked at some of the best Thai restaurants in the area, and they bring their skills and knowledge to the tiny gem of paradise.  “Our philosophy? We want to bring you the best and freshest food at affordable prices,” says Sainoi. And that is exactly what they do.Sainoi points out that their menu is small by comparison to many Thai restaurants. This is because every item is special and Fleming will not send out a dish that is not a source of pride for the restaurant.For more about Chef Jarunee Fleming and Paul Sainoi, including their recipe for Thai Yellow Curry Chicken, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

Read More »
Young at Art

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

As a “creative” kid, I knew firsthand how stressful and out of place that label could be. I can’t tell you how many beautiful spring Saturdays my father would usher me out to the local park so I could chew my mitt in the outfield and watch baseballs fly over my head. I don’t blame my dad for giving it the old college try – he was only trying to share with me the activities he enjoyed as a child. The problem was...I didn’t share his enthusiasm for sports. I wasn’t particularly lazy or protesting the grass-stained polyester uniforms per se, but I had this feeling my time could be spent in a more productive, enlightening manner. Finally, they did see my artistic “potential” through my love of drawing and quickly invested in a rather handsome art kit and drafting table. The mitt and polyester are now a faded memory.Unfortunately, many artistically inclined children find few resources readily available to them at school or at afternoon programs, with athletics taking front and center in funding and participation. Parents tuned in to their child’s creative needs may need to get “creative” themselves, seeking out the right resources and activities. Here are a few ideas to get your little Michelangelo or Martha Graham on the right track....Get Outdoors Being an artistic child doesn’t mean afternoons holed up inside the house during the summer. Take activities outside and practice art together in the open air. Try sidewalk chalk for the younger geniuses and let your older ones try their hand at landscape sketching. “Dramatic” ones might find pleasure putting on small theatre productions for the family (hint: a garage and a few bed sheets make a great proscenium and curtains for show time). Check out the local Parks and Recreation department for special events or classes for kids....For more local kids' Art Programs be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

Read More »
Clarksburg

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

Down Interstate 5, and across the “green bridge” to Highway 160, you’ll find Clarksburg, a tiny, tranquil town with a population of 1,400. The town fronts the languid, murky Sacramento River in true delta-town style. Clarksburg was settled in the mid-1800s as an agricultural community, and today, is known for its grape production. Golden-green grape vines and rows of spectacular vineyards dot the highway to the west, and the docile river, including boats and waterfowl, borders the west.A wine-lover’s dream, Bogle Vineyards might be the most well known winery in the area. Owned by the Bogle family since the 1800s, the 1,000-acre farm originally produced tomatoes and corn. The first grapes were planted in 1968, and picturesque chardonnay grapes are abundant on the property, beckoning visitors to pack a picnic basket and set a spell at outdoor tables with maximum views. The tasting room is a perfect place to sample the especially tasty 2006 Ghosts du Roam, a red and fruity blend of Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre. Of course, any wine in the tasting room is sure to please. Don’t miss the 11th Annual Petite Sirah Port Weekend,?February 14-15, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For multiple grape-filled offerings, stop at the historic Old Sugar Mill. The mill, which processed sugar beets in the 30s, is home to wine-tasting rooms, representing five unique wineries, including Carvalho Family Wines,?Heringer Estates,?Todd Taylor Wines, Solomon Wine Company, and?Revolution Wines. Step inside the cavernous red-brick building and you will quickly find that each tasting room has a unique, charming ambiance. Heringer Estates, lined with skyscraper-like rows of barrels filled to the brim with both robust and delicate wines, is worth a visit. When you’ve worked up an appetite, Husick’s Country Store is the perfect stop. The building, here since the 1800s, now houses the purveyor of fine wines, gifts, and most recently, homemade, mouth-watering cuisine. The Pump House Sandwich – slow roasted turkey and provolone on handcrafted bread with homemade cranberry and orange relish – is popular, as are the many additional lunchtime offerings. Husick’s also makes specialty coffees and other beverages, and hosts wine tastings on third Saturdays, from 1 to 5 p.m.Schumacher Ceramics and Gallery is a must-see. Schumacher, who creates his one-of-a-kind ceramic pieces in a studio beneath his gallery, works and shows his art in a historical building that originally housed Husick’s Hardware. He specializes in handmade sinks and custom tiles, and showcases works of 20 or so potters and artists throughout the area. Schumacher’s work can be seen throughout Sacramento. He created the base for the famed guitar outside Sacramento’s Hard Rock Café, a fountain at the State Capitol’s Rose Garden and other public works. Items like dishware, bowls, sculpture and more line the gallery’s shelves. So, if you're in the mood for a little wine sipping, a little shopping and some great sight-seeing, Clarksburg is a great destination off the beaten path.For more info on Clarksburg be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

Read More »
Check Inn for Valentine’s Day

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching, and while some couples already have plans and ideas to celebrate the 14th with that special someone, this In History is for those who still aren’t quite sure what to do on that wonderful day. Rather than go with the ubiquitous card, candy and flowers, why not treat your significant other to a few days at a bed and breakfast with a picturesque atmosphere? For those who enjoy their Valentine’s Day romance with a dash of history, the following local bed and breakfast inns have ample offerings of both.First up is GlenMorey Country House, located in the heart of Placerville. This gem was built in 1859 and is also known as the historic Henry S. Morey house. Originally built as a farmhouse, GlenMorey has lost none of its rustic charm and antique appeal. The inn is nestled in the middle of a 1.6-acre park, filled with beautiful pines and oaks. If you want to get away from it all without having to drive too far, GlenMorey offers excellent pastoral peace and quiet. There are three spacious guest rooms within the inn that are furnished with period Scottish antiques to add to the ambiance of a quiet country home. Truly, this is a prize for anyone, if fortunate enough to snag a reservation.For those who may not have the good fortune of staying at the GlenMorey House in Placerville, Georgetown has a jewel of its own at the Historic American River Inn. Built in 1853 as a miner’s boarding house, the inn has since been restored. It boasts 13 guest rooms and suites, each with its own Old English antiques and Victorian period accoutrements. In the evenings couples can lounge in the inn’s parlor, warmed by the fireplace, while listening to a variety of musical works on a player piano. Outside, the inn offers a Victorian garden; guests can also enjoy a relaxing winter soak in an eight-person hot tub waiting outside the parlor doors. Finally, a walk around the grounds will prove peaceful and pleasant as guests stroll amongst tall redwoods and English holly trees.Last, but not least, the Coloma Country Inn, and this inn is by no means the least, is tucked away in Coloma – within two-and-a-half-acres of serene gardens and a picturesque pond with willow trees. Built in 1852, this is one of the oldest existing structures in Coloma, and like fine wine, it has improved with age. The inn offers six guest rooms, each filled with antiques and amenities for couples (or families) to appreciate. Red brick paths wind through the grounds, and rose gardens scent the air with their perfume. If you wish to embark on an historical adventure, the Marshall Gold Discovery State Park and Sutter’s Mill are only a hop and skip away from the inn. If you’re looking for restful relaxation and a bit of pampering, these three historic bed and breakfast inns prove that on Valentine’s Day, even history can provide romance.

Read More »
Local Literary Achievers

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

This month we’ve diverged from our regular then & now recommendations, and instead feature here 10 local authors (all residents of the region) and their recent published works.Life’s Little How to Book by Jaleh DonaldsonSchoolteacher Donaldson addresses some of life’s most important issues with straightforward advice, covering a range of topics from a broken relationship to rekindling the passion in marriage to getting out of debt.Second Bloomby Michelle Gamble-Risley and Anne Marie SmithThese local ladies highlight 10 simple steps to Reinvent, Rejuvenate, and Realize a New Life. This read is a tool designed for women who are experiencing what the authors call the “Big Blank” causing them to go on autopilot. Patagonian Adventureby Jack L. ParkerThis follow-up to Parker’s Tibetan Adventure tells a story of death-defying adventure as a father and son travel to the region of Patagonia, Argentina. A must-read for the entire family.Nature Noir: A Park Ranger’s Patrol in the Sierraby Jordan Fisher Smith Murder, irony and natural history – Nature Noir has all three. Smith poignantly writes about his experiences patrolling the canyons of the American River.Hassle-Free Computer Supportby Jeff Johnson & Thor SeversonA small business’s guide to finding a professional, competent, honest, considerate, on-time, fairly-priced and dependable computer consultant.Due Process Denied: Why The Fourteenth Amendment Never Became Part Of The Constitutionby George Pierce RitterFor the politicos, this read explains why the proposal and ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment were anything but constitutional. Not on Your Life!by Karen AndersonKaren Anderson, founder of Do-Able Steps creates simple solutions for women to conquer their fears and achieve long time goals and everyday challenges.Leadership=RC3by John Ikeda“This book is for the rare individual who continuously strives to lead in a way that makes the world a better place to live – a true leader.”48 Dog Friendly Trailsby Debbi PrestonFor dog lovers, experienced and novice hikers and nature lovers, this new hiking guide is organized month-by-month, and offers a plethora of possibilities including off-leash venues, and even suggestions for restaurants, historical sites, wineries and shopping near the hikes.Classic Afghan Cookbook by Mousa M. AmiriWritten by local restaurant (Bamiyan) owner, this book explores the exotic cuisine of Afghanistan with interesting and enjoyable recipes for the whole family.

Read More »
Michelle Hardy

Jan 31, 2009 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

A former firefighter and paramedic, Michelle Hardy has made a life out of helping people in their time of need. After an injury forced her to retire, she started two assisted living facilities, Apple Ridge and Ivy Ridge, where she strives to make a home away from home for the elderly. “At my facilities, people can have an apartment, their own furniture, cable - a more independent lifestyle – so they don’t have to give everything up,” she explains. “Families are happier because they don’t have to feel guilty about leaving Mom and Dad in a home.” In addition, each week Hardy takes her beloved Pit Bull mix, Brownie, to assisted living facilities throughout the Sacramento area, cheering up residents wherever she goes. Hardy adopted Brownie after she had been abused and abandoned by her former owners; Hardy put Brownie through a rigorous one-year course to become a certified therapy dog. Although Pit Bulls have a reputation for being aggressive, Hardy insists that Brownie is far from the stereotype. “She is the sweetest dog you know,” she says. “If you’re sitting there in a wheelchair, she’ll put her head on your lap.”The recent economic crisis has deeply affected both of Hardy’s facilities, but she insists that it isn’t necessary to spend a lot of money to make people happy. “If you don’t have money, donate time,” she urges. “Make one person smile, knowing that it might be their last.” For more information on volunteering, contact Hardy at [email protected] more on Michelle Hardy be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

Read More »
Carol Rhodes-Wittich

Dec 31, 2008 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

If you want to work with someone who cares about your artwork, Carole Rhodes-Wittich is the woman to see. Artists seek Rhodes-Wittich to create new ways do display their artwork. She takes the time to figure out what artists want to accomplish and comes up with ideas to print their work on silk. She runs a digital silk printing business from her location in Fair Oaks.Owner of Cje’s Art & Fiber Printing, Rhodes-Wittich will share what she can do for artists with the Folsom Arts Association at their meeting this month. She specializes in printing on silk, but can print on just about anything, including glass and tile. Artists can use their work on pillows, scarves, T-shirts, canvas and other material. Her work is an art form all in itself. She uses creativity and her expertise to produce quality art piece replicas in which canvas is not the only medium.“In this day and age I spend a lot of time trying to help artists understand how to use their [own] art so they can make it more viable in the marketplace,” Rhodes-Wittich says. “She supports artists and completes projects as quickly as she can,” says Lori Anderson, the vice president of the Folsom Arts Association. Anderson has been taking photos of her paintings to Rhodes-Wittich for three years to have them turned into greeting cards or giccles (pictures of a painting that are printed on canvas). “She enjoys what she’s doing so much,” Anderson says, “she really gets into it and she likes to figure things out and get creative.”Rhodes-Wittich started her business seven years ago without any training, but with plenty of experience from her previous work with glass and textiles. She took classes to improve her skills in those areas at American River College, the Mendocino Art Center and the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. “I’ve always been a textiles person,” Rhodes-Wittich says. “I just like the feel of the fabric.” She bought printing machinery and learned everything from a few technicians who knew how to operate it. Several years later, after much practice, she has become comfortable with the printing process, though she calls technicians in when something goes wrong. Silk can become damaged at any point in the printing process. After the paper-backed silk is printed, Rhodes-Wittich takes the paper off. Then she places the silk into a commercial steamer, runs it through the laundry and irons it wet. The process is not easy, but the silk turns out beautiful when done right.“Silk is pretty sturdy,” she says, “and a lot of people think it’s very delicate; it just looks delicate.”Rhodes-Wittich has printed fellow artist Susan Cawthon’s watercolor paintings on silk so that Cawthon can make pillows and other pieces from them. Cawthon started taking her work to Rhodes-Wittich about a year after she began painting and says that Rhodes-Wittich often spends hours helping her figure out what she should do with her artwork. Rhodes-Wittich is so involved in the creative process of the pieces she prints that the final work of art is a result of committed collaboration.

Read More »
Simple Heroes

Dec 31, 2008 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

Anyone who has witnessed a homeless child receive a warm winter coat, or an elderly woman be helped up the stairs by an individual far more agile, knows that simple acts of kindness are indeed heroic. Uncomplicated but generous acts of heroism prove that each of us have transformative special powers. Because seemingly insignificant action can have a life-long impact, there is the Simple Heroes Initiative, which encourages community residents to support underserved foster youth by providing them with basic needs they have been denied. In order to connect these individuals with resources, the Initiative was established in 2008 in conjunction with Generation Fate, a nonprofit also dedicated to assisting local foster youth. After meeting with countless social workers, foster parents and foster children, Generation Fate’s Founder and Director Nick Cunningham continually heard the same story. “I was told that there were little things foster children missed out on like high school prom, extracurricular activities or driver's education courses because of a lack of resources,” he explains. “I knew there were resources in the community, but there was just no conduit to put two and two together.”Until, that is, the Simple Heroes Initiative, which predominately serves Placer County youth, but continues to branch out and assists children throughout the greater Sacramento region and Yolo County. In 2007, the year Generation Fate was founded, the organization was openly exploratory and unsure of how to effectively reach the targeted demographic. “This mentality does not make it easy to get funding from larger foundations and organizations,” admits Cunningham, who adds that because Generation Fate’s mission, at that point, lacked focus, the organization did not receive crucial monetary funding to support the Initiative or its beneficiaries, forcing the team to identify alternative ways to operate and help others on a shoestring budget. Consequently, individual donations were responsible for 80 percent of overall revenue.“During the process our eyes were opened to the vast amounts of people in our community that were ready and willing to help these children,” Cunningham says. “And with the network of volunteers and supporters that slowly built up, we have been able to connect with and help hundreds of foster youth.” Assistance comes in different ways, which might be a new pair contact lenses or a computer, to art supplies or admission to an exhibit.“Some foster youth do not experience much of a life outside of the system, and allowing them to play baseball, go to prom or attend a class field trip gives them something positive to attach to; it brings a little balance into their often chaotic lives,” Cunningham explains.  Among the ambitions of Generation Fate, Inc., and its organizers and supporters, is to secure long-term monetary funding and to create models of the organization that can be scaled and duplicated in other communities.To learn more about Generation Fate, Inc., and the Simple Heroes Initiative, upcoming fund-raisers, and how you can help, please visit the organization online at generationfate.org and/or simpleheroes.com, email [email protected], or call 916-987-2889.

Read More »
I Promise To...

Dec 31, 2008 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

The beginning of January is the traditional time we pledge to lead healthier, happier, more fulfilling lives in the year ahead. Making New Year’s resolutions helps formalize our personal goals of behavioral change, and hopefully provides the motivation we need to stay on track past February. But resolutions aren’t just for grownups. Annual goal setting also can be helpful for kids and adolescents who face increasing responsibilities at home, in school and in their community. To help celebrate the New Year, we asked a few local kids to share their poignant, funny and inspiring resolutions for 2009. Alexander's Resolution“In 2009, I resolve to work harder in everything that I do. I also want to work on the sports that I play the most because I have not scored a touchdown yet…not even one in the whole season. And I will also work on playing quiet games with my sister and letting my mom and dad sleep. And I will try to eat healthier food and work on not playing so many video games. I will also work on having the best table manners at all times and [at] all dinners. Most of all, I will definitely try to be a lot better in responsibility and taking care of my things, like my Swiss army knife.”— Alexander, Age 8 3rd Grade, Oak Meadow ElementaryEl Dorado Hills...If your child hasn’t made any New Year’s resolutions yet, it’s not too late. Helping children set goals can be a fun and enlightening experience for the whole family. You may be surprised to hear what they have prioritized for 2009!For more local kids' New Year's resolutions be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

Read More »
Achieving Health Happiness

Dec 31, 2008 04:00PM ● By Super Admin

Mike was told he would never walk again after a near-fatal head-on collision with a semi. Dennis was 200 pounds overweight, had undergone three surgeries and was taking 13 prescription medications per day. Sandra simply wanted to get in better shape in order to prevent the diabetes and heart disease her family is prone to.There are as many different reasons to make changes to diet and exercise habits as there are people. No matter your age or size, chances are, there is something about yourself you would like to improve. Thinking beyond the “you” of today, physical fitness is important for the “you” of the future. Being Proactive is Key for Better Health Better physical fitness can prevent accidents as well, or at least minimize the damage they cause. Steven Harrity, Physical Therapist, Owner and President of Cameron Park Physical Therapy, works with people in his wellness center who want to lose weight or otherwise improve their health. Harrity notes that with the rising levels of obesity in the country, there is also an increase in the number of people who are proactively improving their health before accidents or diseases affect them.“The better physical condition you’re in, the less chance you have of falls or other accidents,” says Harrity. He points out that increased muscle and ligament strength and improved balance all contribute to this, and protects your bones if you do have an accident. Harrity’s practice also works with many seniors for the same reason. As we age, changes to our inner ears and eyes cause changes to our balance, increasing the risk of falls. “We work with all [body] systems to help them be more stable. When they fall, they lose confidence and become more sedentary and homebound, which makes them more likely to fall [again].” With increased physical fitness, this vicious cycle can be broken. Roseville Health and Wellness is equally committed to helping clients achieve their best possible fitness level. “Our goal is to make Roseville the healthiest community in America. We provide a unique combination of medical, rehabilitation, and fitness services allowing each individual to achieve total body wellness,” states Jeff DeRaps, President RHWC, Inc.An Alarming TrendAccording to the American Medical Association, obesity is the number two preventable cause of death in the United States, after smoking and before alcohol abuse. Causes of obesity include poor dietary choices, an increasingly inactive lifestyle, genetics and socioeconomic strata. Of course, the management of one’s diet is fundamental to healthy weight. As important as dietary choices, if not more so, is maintaining a healthy amount of physical exercise. Jobs in the United States are increasingly sedentary as much of our physical labor is transitioned off shore and even the normal labor of office work is reduced through increased automation. These are minor changes, but they add up to a tendency toward being inactive and, ultimately, to weight gain.Vowing to lose weight or to achieve better muscle tone is easy. We all do it with the best of intentions, making New Year’s resolutions every year to lose “X” amount of weight or to take up jogging. The hard part, it turns out, is actually doing anything about it. FoothillStyle recently had the opportunity to speak with a few admirable people who not only made the vow to achieve better health, but who had the discipline to take the necessary steps. Some made the choice to achieve better health, but in one case the choice was made for him. Here are their stories....Mike CooneyMike, a former firefighter, worked in dairy testing. It was a job that kept him on the road long hours in the dark of the early morning. One day he was driving his pickup truck on the job when, too late, he realized that a semi was heading directly for him. The semi was over so far the line that he was driving on the shoulder on Mike’s side of the road, and there was no avoiding the collision. The investigators said later that the relative speed of the two vehicles was around 140 miles per hour when they met.Mike does not remember much of the details of the accident. In fact, he does not remember much of the three months that followed – he spent that time comatose, which may have actually been a good thing, as he had suffered about 20 broken bones – in fact, he was lucky to have survived. Once he regained consciousness he was informed that he would be spending the rest of his life in a wheelchair.Mike, however, is not one to be told what he can and cannot do, and he is certainly not one to be told to stay in a wheelchair for the rest of his life, so he applied himself to proving his doctor wrong. It was not a journey that his wife felt that she could take with him, so she filed for divorce, leaving Mike on his own. Not to be deterred, he pressed on relentlessly.After some improvement in Mike’s condition, the doctors told him that he would be able to walk, but it would be only with a walker and with great difficulty. Also, they were going to need to amputate one of his feet due to the extreme injuries it had suffered. The foot surgery was a low priority, however, and the surgery to remove the foot was put off to a later date. Determined to keep his foot, Mike put the time to good use and used physical therapy to improve his foot to the point that he was able to keep it. He is still working with his foot to continue to increase his strength, but there are no more threats of amputation hanging over his head.Mike has been at the Snap Fitness Center in Shingle Springs since Spring 2007, growing his strength and physical fitness every day.  He credits Becky, Marcy and Glenda with much of his recovery. “If it weren’t for them, I might still be sitting around thinking about it,” he says. “The environment that they create at Snap is really great – they keep you going and they encourage you to achieve your goals. I would not be anywhere near as fit as I am now if it weren’t for them.” He is not a runner, yet, but he plans to be one day. “You have to decide what you want your life to be like and then you have to take the steps to make it that way,” according to Mike. “If you are comfortable sitting in the chair and looking at the wall, that’s fine, but if you want something else, you have to take the steps to get there.”Mike is a very self-effacing guy. He does not see his journey as an heroic one, just one that he had to take. Not everyone has the same motivations as Mike to make tremendous changes in their lives, but many of us have something about us that we would like to change. Whether we just want to be fitter so we can do our jobs better, look better in our clothes or avoid accidents, or whether we have to make a change to save our lives and mobility, there is help out there. Anyone who truly wants to make a change can find a way to do it, and we here at FoothillStyle wish you all the luck and success in the world. Here’s to a new you in 2009: Are you up to the challenge?For more inspiring local stories of achieving health happiness, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116

Read More »
Upcoming Events Near You

No Events in the next 21 days.