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True Colors

May 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

According to scientific definition, the color we see is the effect that light of varying wavelengths and frequencies has on our eye and the optical nerves. Applying that definition to something like a rainbow is kind of depressing. It’s like the “no Santa Claus” theory of Christmas – it just sucks the fun right out. Science aside, color is fun and dramatic, and we use it to tell ourselves all kinds of things. Consider the meanings we give to roses – white for apology, red for love, yellow for jealousy. Or the way color can be used to express emotion in art. Or, to encourage a certain type of mood, your interior design colors orchestrate this example. Red is thought to bring energy and warmth, where green is seen to be relaxing; yellow is cheerful; and blue is cool and calming. Anecdotal stories about the emotional effects of color are pretty eyebrow raising. Years ago I read about a color called “Baker’s Pink,” supposedly used in insane asylums in the 1920s for its calming effect on patients. Legend has it that the color had the complete opposite effect, bringing on violent reactions among the patients, and consequently the use and manufacturing of the color was hastily discontinued (and let’s face it, painting any room pink is really just asking for trouble).Whether the effect of color on our moods is real or imagined, it’s a pleasant way to view the world. Sure, it’s just light reflecting off our brain or whatever, but that doesn’t mean we can’t believe in our own “color Santa.” With the growing popularity of personal development in careers and relationships, a number of organizations have started using color to identify personality types. (I’m purple. Can’t you tell?) One such organization is True Colors, Inc. (true-colors.com). True Colors applies colors (Blue, Gold, Green and Orange) to four basic personality types derived from existing psychological studies (in particular the work of clinical psychologist David Keirsey). Participants build their own ‘color spectrum’ based on their personality strengths and weaknesses, and the color spectrum can then be applied in larger ways to help determine a career or educational path. A program like True Colors allows participants to connect with their own strengths and weaknesses with a fun and entertaining approach that allows people to relax and better embrace new ideas. An approach like this is really a way to see your strengths with fresh eyes. True Colors has a career and educational focus, particularly beneficial to corporations, schools, government and non-profit organizations. True colors helps us to better understand our own personality needs and values, thus recognizing others’ personality traits. You can image how not only an understanding, but also an awareness of personality needs and values can positively impact a workplace, classroom or home environment. So if you’re feeling a little brown or gray, and need to find your inner orange, gold, green or blue, then maybe it’s time to seek out your inner rainbow and identify your own true colors. •THE COLORSOrange – Orange personalities act on a moment’s notice; are witty, charming and spontaneous. They consider life a game, and are impulsive and generous. Oranges need fun, variety, stimulation and excitement and are described as optimistic, eager and bold. They value skill, resourcefulness, and courage, and are natural trouble shooters, performers and competitors.Gold – Gold personalities follow the rules and respect authority. Always loyal, dependable and prepared, they have a strong sense of what is right and wrong in life. They need to be useful and to belong. Faithful and stable, sensible and organized, they value home, family and tradition. Those whose brightest color is gold are natural preservers, helpful, good citizens and are caring and concerned.Green – Green personalities seek knowledge and understanding as they are analytical and conceptual and live life by their own standards. Cool, calm and collected, they value intelligence, insight, fairness and justice. They are inventive, logical perfectionists who can think in the abstract, are investigative and hypothetical. Those who have green as their brightest color are natural non-conformists, visionaries and natural problem solvers.Blue – Blue personalities need to feel unique and authentic. They are enthusiastic, warm, compassionate, sympathetic and personal. In life they look for meaning and significance. Natural communicators, blue personalities are sincere and idealistic with a need to contribute, to encourage and to care. They value integrity and unity in relationships, are natural romantics and nurturers.*Printed with permission from True Colors, Inc.

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The Mickey Mouse Club

May 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

I am not a Disney-phile. I do not have Mickey Mouse decals on the back windows of our Tahoe. And I don’t own mouse ears (contrary to this month’s illustration). But, I love the place anyway. Growing up in soggy Olympia, Washington, Disneyland to me may as well have been Oz, and most of my grade school friends felt the same way. The sun and surf of southern California seemed a million miles from our lead-gray skies. Not many of our parents had the inclination (nor the money for that matter) to ever plan a trip there. All we knew of the “Happiest Place on Earth” was what we saw watching The Wonderful World of Disney on Sunday nights. It was magical, though – a castle, rising majestically in a land where it never rains...? Oh, man. Which is why, if over summer vacation one of our classmates had gotten to go, the rest of us would crowd closely around him, for he had been to the Promise Land! With chins dangling near the frayed knees of our Toughskins, we listened as our elementary emissaries spoke in hushed, reverent tones of Pirates of the Caribbean, the Matterhorn and Submarine Voyage. We were awe-struck, dumbfounded and envious. We all asked, “Did you go to Space Mountain?”“Six times.” “No way!”“My sister threw up her corn dog!”And in unison we shot back with, “AWESOME!”For the rest of the school year, that kid could strut around the playground of South Bay Elementary like royalty. I still remember some of them – Robbie Campbell, who was shaving in fifth grade; Jeff Goobe, a kickball legend; Chris Pleasant, whose parents were rich; and Garrett Sailor, whose parents were not at all. Even Kit Sunsten, who had the unsavory reputation as a paste-eater, became cool overnight when he showed up from summer break wearing the coveted Mickey Mouse shirt.The first time that I went, I was 26. I was recently married and focused on being a true adult for the first time in my life. But the moment I set foot on Main Street USA, it was as though Tinker Bell took her wand and punk-slapped me back to the 1970s. The castle wasn’t quite as big as it seemed on TV, but it was still, you know, The Castle! And there was Adventureland, Frontierland and the Monorail! I went on the Matterhorn and kept my corn dog down, but the Teacups almost brought back it up. I knew enough to avoid a global-scale song suckering by taking a wide berth around Small World. Space Mountain was every bit as cool as Jeff Goobe said. And while somewhere in nearby Hollywood, a young Johnny Depp was taping the third season of “21 Jump Street,” I became smitten with Pirates of the Caribbean, which is still my favorite ride. The only bummer of the whole day was finding out that they don’t sell beer. Well, that and the Country Bears. I’ve been back with my family a few times since, even though by the time we leave, the ribs on my wallet are always showing. I mean, let’s be honest, Mickey pretty much attaches a big cartoon vacuum to your bank account from the moment you step off of the parking lot tram. Yet in spite of that, the park retains its sense of time-spared innocence. Maybe it’s because we want it to. Maybe it’s because we need it to. Or maybe it really is real. It doesn’t matter. All I know is, each time I’m lucky enough to go, I become that awe-struck kid again in the frayed Toughskin jeans, and the gray skies seem to be a million miles away. •Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1 KNCI.

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Get To Know...

May 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

June Wanish, one of the founders of Roseville Arts and a former city mayor, has lived in Roseville her entire life. From the beginning, she seemed destined to make an impact on this town – she learned the importance of getting involved from her parents, who were always active volunteers in the community. Looking at the striking Roseville Arts Blue Line Gallery on Vernon Street today, it’s difficult to believe the organization was born out of a simple school fundraiser. In 1964, Wanish was a member of her daughter’s school PTA and helped organize an art-related fundraiser that was hugely successful. Realizing the community had an interest, she helped start a non-profit organization to promote the enjoyment of the arts and to support local artists. More than 40 years later, her dream is still alive. Roseville Arts, however, was only the beginning for Wanish when it came to helping the city. In 1978, she became the first woman ever elected to the City Council. “When I decided to run,” Wanish laughs, “everyone asked me what I was mad at. Apparently people thought you had to be mad at something to want to run for city council. But I just wanted to be involved.”  With all that she’s done, Wanish is most passionate about volunteering. “If there is something to be done, get involved!” she says emphatically. “You will gain so much. Volunteers are the backbone of the community!”— Christine HaleFor more on June Wanish, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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