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Artistic Expression

Aug 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Like love, art is indescribable – better defined as an act than as something that is. Here, a potter, a painter, a sculptor and an organization not only create art, but also define it. Brian Hayes – The Potter“All potters know a little bit about Japanese history, since the oldest pottery in the world is Japanese,” says Brian Hayes, who has taken that truth a bit farther in combining his own pottery work with a love of Japanese culture and history.Hayes’ love of pottery and interest in Japanese history have always been intertwined. He has a master’s degree in Japanese aesthetics, art and philosophy, and has traveled to Japan four times, including a trip in the early 90s to work with a young Japanese potter.While most of Hayes’ work is 70 percent functional and fired in gas-burning kilns, he also has two Japanese-style wood kilns on his five-acre property in Coloma. He is currently involved in helping raise money for the purchase of the Wakamatsu Tea and Silk Colony location at Gold Hill, next to his property, by donating Japanese tea bowls fired in either his gas-burning kilns or traditional wood-burning kilns for contributors of $500 and $1,000. It was the first Japanese colony in the United States, established in 1869.The Wakamatsu Project centers on the life of Okei Ito, a young woman who died on the property shortly after its establishment. Hayes created a tea bowl to honor Okei’s life with the symbol for woman carved into its surface.An assistant professor at the El Dorado Center of Folsom Lake College, Hayes manages to spend enough time doing the things he truly loves – making pottery, working on his farm with his wife and fishing.He holds two annual shows at his studio, and advertises them through his mailing list. To get on the list, e-mail him at [email protected] more Local Inspiring Artists, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Swing Time

Aug 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Let me start by saying this: this wasn’t exactly my first golf lesson. In an effort to learn the sport near and dear to my fiancé’s heart, I signed up for a series of three golf lessons back in 2005. We had hoped we could play together on our honeymoon in Maui that upcoming summer. My first lesson, unfortunately, was not particularly helpful, and on the way to my second, I got into a fender-bender, which, alas, totaled my car and resulted in a trip to the emergency room (and a couple stitches in my forehead). And that was that: bye-bye golf for me. Though we did plenty of other fun things in Maui on our honeymoon, golf was not one of them.Looking back, I guess it was silly to give up on the sport that quickly, and excuse me, but golf is hard! Never one to want to wear the label of quitter, when the opportunity arose again for me to take my second-first-golf-lesson, I gave it another try. I packed up my clubs, bought a cute new polo shirt, and headed out to meet Sarah Huarte, golf pro at Woodcreek Golf Club. From the moment she greeted me in the pro-shop, she made me feel comfortable and a lot less like the klutzy golfer who I feared I’d be, and more like the Tigress-Woods-in-training who I hoped to be. Well, maybe not quite that awesome, but we were definitely off to a good start.I learned Huarte was born and raised in the area, and grew up to be a Cal Berkeley grad, a two-time All American golfer, a former member of the Curtis Cup Team and World Amateur Team, recipient of the NCAA Championship Individual Title and a pro since 2004. Oh, and last year she was on the LPGA tour and competed in eight events. Whew. I was in good hands.On the driving range, we worked on the basics: grip, posture and alignment. She taught me that if these three things were mastered first, I would be seeing vast improvements in my game. “The better that you can hold your starting position posture throughout your swing, the easier it will be to hit consistent shots. The spine angle [should] rotate, but not straighten,” Huarte says. I was finding it a little difficult to keep all of the variables straight in my head. When I approached the tee, my mind was racing: Grip? Check. Posture? Check. Alignment? Check. Club position? Ball position? Head, shoulders, knees, and toes, knees and toes…? It was overwhelming and I wanted to be perfect — her best student, ever.“I think beginners should start practicing with a seven or nine iron until they are consistently hitting the ball in the air every time,” Huarte told me. Keep it simple, at first. Good point.So that’s what I did, and though I whiffed the ball more than a couple times, and swung over the top of the ball, causing it to roll a few feet instead of fly far, far away; slowly but surely, I began to hit the ball in the air. My lesson was working!The half-hour that Huarte spent with me on the driving range helped to erase the negative connotations that I associated with golf just a few years ago. I left the driving range feeling more confident and inspired to keep practicing, not only because of Huarte’s skill as an instructor, but also because of her encouraging nature. She helped my game, and she taught me how to be OK with not being an immediate golf goddess. I’m working on it, though. I just have to convince my husband to take me back to Maui to practice.Sarah Huarte is a Golf Professional at Woodcreek Golf Club in Roseville. She can be reached at 916-773-0727 ext. 6, or [email protected]

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Local Winemakers

Aug 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Winemaking, or vinification, starts with the selection of grapes and ends with the bottling of a perfectly finished wine, and in our region, it’s some of the best around. Recently, Style visited a few of our notable wineries and vineyards to get a taste of what’s being crushed in our own backyards. Montevina WineryNestled in the rolling hills of Amador County, Montevina Winery is steeped in history. Established in 1970, Montevina was the first post-Prohibition winery in the Sierra foothills region. Soon, the winery became known for its top-quality wines. Amador County is known for its Zinfandels, many grown from centuries-old vines; the soil and climate combination make it the perfect home for this varietal. And, Montevina produces some of the best Zinfandels around.Now part of the Trinchero Family Estates, Montevina is the largest and most modern winery in Amador County. Under VP and General Manager Jeff Meyers and winemaker Chris Leamy, Montevina produces world-class, award-winning wines in its state-of-the-art facility under the Montevina and Terra d’Oro labels, and its eclectic red and white blend under the Wild Bunch label.Set within 400 acres of gorgeous scenery, Montevina’s tasting room and shaded outdoor patio is casual and inviting, and provides an idyllic setting for a romantic picnic. So pack your picnic basket and head to Plymouth to experience the history and delicious wines of Montevina.Varietals:Sangiovese, Zinfandel, Barbera, Pinot Grigio, Muscato, Anglianico, Teroldego, Sauvignon BlancFavorite:Terra d’Oro Zinfandel – Terra d’Oro, literally translated as “land of gold,” is Montevina’s premier wine, produced from the winery’s best lots in limited quantities. It's one Zinfandel that's just right! According to the winemaker’s notes, “Like a backyard barbeque, dark smoky molasses and hickory aromas warm the nose. Blackberry flavors are spiced with pepper, clove and anise like homemade preserves. A long lingering caramel finish touched by dark toasty oak begs for another sip.”Where to find Montevina wines: Montevina’s wines can be found at montevina.com, and at Total Wine & More in Roseville, Beverages & More, Raley’s/Bel Air and Sam’s Club locations throughout the Sacramento area.Winery & Tasting Room:Montevina Winery20680 Shenandoah School RoadPlymouth209-245-6942Open daily, 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. For more Local Winemakers, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Preschool

Aug 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

To say that young children are impressionable is a blatant understatement. From birth to age five, the physical framework and wiring of a child’s brain develops largely based upon his or her experiences during those early years.Quality experiences are the goal of First 5 California’s investment of nearly one billion dollars into affordable, quality preschools for all. First 5 Executive Director Kris Perry explains, “A series of studies over a period of 40 years shows that children who participate in high quality preschool programs are less likely to be in the court system, are less likely to require social services, are more likely to graduate from high school and college, and are more likely to make higher earnings.”  Experts say it’s the basic lessons learned in preschool that set the stage for success in school, and in life. ...Preschool and Kindergarten Readiness ProgramsParents researching preschool choices will find hundreds of private preschools in the Greater Sacramento area. For eligible families, the federally-funded Head Start or State Preschool programs provide free early education and kindergarten preparedness classes. In Placer County, the Eureka Union School District has teamed with Star Enrichment to offer economical year-round preschool and/or kindergarten readiness programs at Maidu, Oakhills and Olive Ranch schools in Roseville/Granite Bay and Foskett Ranch School in Lincoln.And over the summer, free transitional programs offered through county school districts give future kindergartners a chance to visit their new school, spend time in group circles and meet their new teacher. El Dorado County’s summer camps are provided at five different schools, and the county’s First 5 commission produced a video called “Off to School: Kindergarten is Cool,” available on the county Web site. ...<hr>For more Preschool Information, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Preschool

Aug 31, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

To say that young children are impressionable is a blatant understatement. From birth to age five, the physical framework and wiring of a child’s brain develops largely based upon his or her experiences during those early years.Quality experiences are the goal of First 5 California’s investment of nearly one billion dollars into affordable, quality preschools for all. First 5 Executive Director Kris Perry explains, “A series of studies over a period of 40 years shows that children who participate in high quality preschool programs are less likely to be in the court system, are less likely to require social services, are more likely to graduate from high school and college, and are more likely to make higher earnings.”  Experts say it’s the basic lessons learned in preschool that set the stage for success in school, and in life.How Preschool Prepares ChildrenA preschool teacher for 32 years, Lise Witthaus first opened the Folsom Montessori School in 1980. As she notes proudly, she now teaches children of former students. “The most important thing a child learns in preschool is how to be part of a school community,” says Witthaus. “They learn how to be in a group, and how to participate and take cues from their peers.” And key, she says, they learn how to take direction that’s given to the class, not just to the individual child. According to educators, those skills must be learned in order to succeed in elementary school.Additionally, the importance of academic basics such as reading, math and penmanship cannot be ignored. As First 5’s Perry points out, “School has gotten increasingly difficult.” Perry suggests that the curriculum most parents were taught when they were in first grade, is what today’s kindergartners are learning. “So the more parents can help their child prepare ahead of time, the better they will do the whole time they are in school.” ...<hr>For more Preschool Information, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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