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Blazing Heroes

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

On July third, I hiked with my son to the top of Mt. Tallac, above Lake Tahoe. From our 9,700-foot vantage point we could see 360 degrees. It was beautifully clear and the lake below us glimmered like an alpine sea. But above us, angel-hair wisps of smoke drifted like cobwebs along the jet stream and to the north a hundred miles or so, a great industrial-sized column of smoke billowed from the hills of Butte County. West of us, in the Desolation Wilderness, Pyramid Peak rose starkly against a sky jaundiced from fires in the American River Canyon. It would be the last nice day we’d have for a while.As I write, it is now mid-July and our air is filled with a choking yellow haze. The smoke from those fires, and others, collects in the valley like a searing fog. It stings the eyes, scratches the throat, and turns anything more than a hundred yards away into ethereal smudges. Like a skein of oil on the surface of water, it seems to settle the very air that carries it. A lid of heat holds it all down and inside we cook. In the foothills it’s worse: the honey-colored haze is sticky and thick among stands of oaks. It doesn’t just dissolve whole ridges, it erases entire mountains.  In those mountains, fire crews battle. There are thousands from all across the country and fire stations just down the street. Dressed in lemon yellow and armed with hoses, chainsaws, shovels and bulldozers, and supported from the air by nimble helicopters and lumbering C-130 tanker planes, they climb into the fire, stomping up steep slopes at high elevation, sometimes bearing packs weighing sixty pounds. They drink gallons of water and burn up to 7,000 calories a day. They are streaked with sweat, dirt, grime and soot. They watch for rattlesnakes and poison oak and tree branch torches that burn free from their trunks and fall without warning. They watch the wind, wary of any sudden gusts or unexpected eddies that could rouse the flames and quickly whip them into a life-threatening frenzy. These men and women are scratched and bruised and fatigued to their core. But still they fight, because it’s what they do and it’s what they love. When you live down here among the stoplights, cul-de-sacs and shopping plazas, the wilderness we visit only in the best conditions can become abstract and taken for granted. Now, as it burns and the smoke fills our streets and our lungs, we are reminded once again that all of us—man, beast, and sugar pine forest—are connected.Firefighters, like soldiers and police officers, belong to a profession that we too easily take for granted, until they’re needed. And too often we fail to pay proper tribute unless tragedy strikes.A few weeks after writing the initial portion of this essay, the worst happened and nine firefighters were killed in a helicopter accident in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Days before that, two other firefighters lost their lives. Our hearts go out to their families. Our gratitude resides with their memories.In this issue, we celebrate the best this region has to offer. I hope in some small way this piece serves to pay proper homage to the men and women who risked everything to step into the ring of fire this long, hot combustible summer.  Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1 KNCI.

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Style Magazine
Local Area Tidbits

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

This issue marks the fourth anniversary of our Readers’ Choice Awards – inside you’ll find your top picks for community businesses, figures and organizations. Look out for piano retailer Sherman Clay, new to Roseville as of September, and Sonoma County eatery Johnny Garlic’s, opening in Roseville this month… There’s twice the reason to head out to The Greenhouse restaurant in Roseville for great brew. Not only is it one of the few organic microbreweries in the nation, but the Brewmaster is one of only 23 Supreme Master Brew judges in the world! …How well do you know your community athletes? The Sierra College Wolverine Athletic Association is holding a “Search for Elusive Wolverines” contest until October 15th. Entrants must submit photo or video evidence of a “Wolverine Sighting”– a glimpse of a Sierra College athletic alumnus, the name of the alumnus and the sport he or she played at Sierra College, to compete. The contestant who sends in the most sightings will receive a $100 cash prize and two passes for all sporting events for the upcoming year. For more information or to submit an entry, e-mail Susanne Michaels at [email protected] you been to Old Town Roseville lately? The words “cool” and “urban” may not have been associated with this part of town in the past, but stop by Basic Urban Kitchen and see one of the resasons Old Town is helping to put “urban” back into suburban.…Congratulations to novelist Jennifer Martin, who was awarded the Moondance International Film Festival’s Columbine award for her screenplay, The Hunatics Club. The award is presented to an author whose work promotes non-violence and alternatives to violent conflict resolution…The philanthropic spirit of the Rotary Club of Roseville doesn’t just serve our own community – it extends beyond our nation’s borders! The Rotary Club recently donated an ambulance to the Mexican Red Cross…Nominees for the Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance’s Elly Awards were announced – the Theatre at Granite Bay received two nominations, Woodcreek High School, Whitney High School, and Auburn’s Music and More Arts Academy and Theatre each received six, Oakmont High School received seven, and Roseville’s Magic Circle Theatre received 20. Bravo! Check out the results at sarta.com...It’s October and time to break out the jack-o-lanterns, scarecrows and mountains of candy corn! Parents can bring kids aged 12 and under to Sunset Center Main Hall in Rocklin for a safe alternative to trick-or-treating. Kids will enjoy prizes, games, bounce houses and goody bags. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 916-625-5200 or visit rocklin.ca.gov...In the “oops, we’re-only-human” department, we must note that the photo for Granito’s A Garlic Experience Chef Daniel Seifried in our July issue’s Dish was incorrect. Take a look in the October issue for the correct photograph, and stop by Granito’s to taste Chef Daniel’s delights. That’s all for now, but check in next month as we ring in the holiday season with our annual Thanksgiving issue! Do you have newsworthy tidbits for our What's Up column? Send it to us at [email protected]

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The Vine

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

2005 Baron Philippe de Rothschild Escudo Rojo The foundation of the Rothschild name was taken to new heights in the wine world when Baron Nathaniel de Rothschild purchased property formerly known as Chateau Brane-Mouton and renamed it Chateau Mouton-Rothschild. In 1922, his great grandson, Baron Philippe de Rothschild become one of the best wine producers in the world.In the fine Bordeaux tradition,  today’s Baron Philippe de Rothschild S.A. began a new venture in Chile and in 2003 he created Escudo Rojo with the founding of a Bodgea in Maipo, Chile. Escudo Rojo is a classic Bordeaux-style blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Carmenère, Syrah and Cabernet Franc. The 2005 vintage drinks like a wine two to three times its cost, and at under $15 a bottle, it is an exceptionally great value. It shows a harmonious balance of ripe cherry, black currant, and raspberry flavors with subtle characters of vanilla and desirable mature tannin, then finishes long and silky. This is a wine to swoon over.—Rick MindermannRick is a 30-year veteran grocer with Corti Brothers in Sacramento,personal assistant to Darrell Corti, and “The Good Taste Guy” for oodleboxtv.com.For more wine reviews, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Style Magazine
Local Area Tidbits

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

This issue marks the second anniversary of our Readers’ Choice Awards! Inside you’ll find your top picks for community businesses, figures and organizations. The competition is tough, and it gets tougher every year as more excellent businesses join our community. Speaking of new business, Folsom’s Sierra Vista Bank, formerly Commerce Bank of Folsom, is coming to Cameron Park. The bank will open a new branch in the Sam’s Town Marketplace on Coach Lane. For more information, call 916-850-1500 or visit sierravistabank.com...National Depression Screening Day is on October 10. Visit mentalhealthscreening.orgto find free and anonymous services with mental health professionals in the area…The Placerville Certified Farmers Market closes for the year on October 25. Don’t miss your chance to pick up fresh produce and other items on Wednesdays (held at the Bell Tower, 5 p.m. to dusk) or Saturdays (held at the Ivy House parking lot at the corner of Clay and Main Streets, 8 a.m. to noon) through the month. For more information, call 530-622-1900 or visit eldoradofarmersmarket.com...The ever-popular Coloma Gold Rush Live Festival, celebrating and reliving the gold rush days of the 1850s, will return to Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park from Saturday, October 11 through Monday, October 13. For more information, call 530-295-2162 or 530-622-3470, or visit marshallgold.org...There’s no business like show business, especially in the Sierra foothills! Nominations for the Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance (SARTA) Elly Awards were announced in August – El Dorado High School received 20 nominations, including acting, direction, choreography, design, and Overall Education Musical Production nods for Les Miserables, acting and Overall Education Play Production nods for A Flea in Her Ear, and a supporting actress nod for The Adding Machine. Placerville’s Imagination Theatre received six nominations, including Best Leading Child Actor nods for both Adam Ainsworth and Emily Barker’s performances in The Enchanted Adventures of Hanzel and Grethel. Bravo to all the winners! Check out the results at sarta.com…It’s time to break out the jack-o-lanterns, scarecrows and mountains of candy corn! El Dorado County organizations are offering plenty of Halloween night activities fit for the whole family. A children’s Halloween Party will be held at the Pollock Pines-Camino Community Center from 5 to 8 p.m. Call 530-647-800 for more information. Downtown Foresthill will be open for trick-or-treating, families can visit retailers and businesses in the downtown area for plenty of goodies! For more information, call 530-367-2474. Kids can also visit Historic Main Street for trick-or-treat goodies, a costume contest and a carnival, sponsored by Historic Main Street merchants, Placerville Parks & Recreation, the Placerville 20/30 Club and the Placerville Lions Club. For more information, call 530-672-3436...And last but not least, in our September issue’s Swag we mistakenly listed the Spoiled Rotten Boutique’s location to be in Placerville, but Cameron Park folks don’t worry, they did not move and they’re still located at 3330 Cameron Park Drive...That’s all for now, but check in next month as we ring in the holiday season with our annual Thanksgiving issue!…Do you have newsworthy tidbits for our What's Up column? Send it to us at [email protected]

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Nashville

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

The United States is a country so large and diverse that a domestic trip can feel like an international one. Perhaps no regional contrast is starker than that between the casual West Coast and the decorous South. With its gentle yet dignified pace, signature drawl and profound sense of tradition, the American South is a veritable nation within a nation. Nashville, Tennessee is known as “The Athens of the South,” a moniker that refers to its proud heritage of higher education. This vibrant city also resembles classical Athens in its increasingly cosmopolitan character, its wealth of cultural outlets, and in the civic pride that is evident among its residents. Unless you’re a country music aficionado, Nashville may not be the first place that you think of when you’re planning a getaway, but with all of its charm, style and hospitality, it’s time that this undervalued southern gem got some attention.Where to StayThere is a wide selection of hotels, from the high-end to the budget-friendly, conveniently located in downtown Nashville. Staying in this location offers an advantage in that you will be within walking distance of many popular tourist destinations. However, if country music is your passion, there isn’t a better place to stay than Gaylord Opryland, just over 10 miles from the heart of downtown. You’ll pay more to stay at this world-class resort than you would at other area hotels, but you’ll also have access to enough amenities and entertainment options to keep the most tireless of tourists busy for days on end. With a lavish indoor atrium, on-site nightclub Fuse, over a dozen eateries and bars, plenty of shops, a nearby golf course, multiple swimming pools, and adjacent music venues, this is a virtual theme park of a hotel reminiscent of the pleasure palaces of Las Vegas. Style tip: the Radisson Hotel at Opryland is located right next to Gaylord Opryland (there is even overlapping shuttle service between the two hotels), but offers lower rates.For more on Nashville, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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A Chef's Affair, Fine Catering

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

How would you feel if Luciano Pavarotti walked into your kitchen and asked for something to eat? Well, that’s exactly what happened to Chef Troi Frankhuizen when she worked at the San Francisco Opera Café while studying at the California Culinary Academy. “He asked for something very basic – pasta with olive oil and Gorgonzola.”  Chef Troi Frankhuizen wanted to be a surgical assistant for an opthamologist, but discovered that she was happiest in the kitchen. As a young child, she learned to cook from her Greek “ya ya” (grandma). She opened A Chef’s Affair in 2000. “We are a scratch kitchen. We don’t cut corners —nothing frozen to the fryer. We meet any needs.” Most people don’t know they are a one-stop shop. They do staging, floral design, rentals and can recommend photographers.   Chef Troi likes appetizers to be interactive, creative conversational pieces, and presentation is important. A Chef’s Affair is known for its live stations at events, where they toss pasta or make sushi in front of guests. They have twice received the Best Caterer of Sacramento award.She also has some great ideas for a starting a line of chef attire for women. “Wearing mens’ pants for the past 20 years isn’t really fun.” For more about Chef Troi Frankhuizen and A Chef's Affair including her recipe for Pumpkin Curry Soup, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Mad Hatters

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

In the spring of 2002, Leal Thompson formed a crafting group made up of local senior women. The first month the group learned to make a baby cap. Adorable and easy to make, Thompson hatched a crafty idea to knit a cap for every newborn at Mercy Hospital in Folsom. Although the challenge seemed too ambitious for a group of six women to undertake, they kept their knits about them and pursued the challenge.Today, the former crafting group is known as the Mad Hatters — an El Dorado Hills based non-profit organization with 600 members who provide knitwear (caps, slippers, blankets, scarves, lap robes) for newborns, chemotherapy patients, veterans and seniors. They also donate knitted handicraft to several area hospitals and medical centers, schools, and organizations like Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). “Mad Hatters cares about the community,” says Founder Leal Thompson, an El Dorado Hills resident for 21 years, happily married mother of three and grandmother of four. “Our mission is for every baby born at the hospitals we donate to, to have a Kiddie Kap made by Mad Hatters. We do this by donating our time and talents.” The time commitment of this charitable obligation is extensive, but for members of Mad Hatters, a priceless opportunity that benefits countless individuals in need.Thus far, Mad Hatters has donated 62,000 baby caps to local hospitals alone. In addition to their efforts within the medical sector, members teach school children, Girl Scouts, and teens how to knit and crochet at local libraries; they also provide lessons to community seniors. For their tireless efforts on behalf of so many, state Senator Dave Cox bestowed Mad Hatters with a resolution for Outstanding Volunteerism — an honor awarded at the State Capitol in August of 2002. Thompson, whose little crafting-group-that-could has spawned 27 affiliated Mad Hatters groups throughout California and as far away as Wisconsin, is most proud of the joy that the group has for providing knitwear to the community. She also mentions the warm friendships that have formed among group members, and is quick to credit the ladies who make possible this “very rewarding project.” Mad Hatters can rightly be considered a social organization as much a service one, as its members have a strong communal connection, which they also share with the local communities and residents they serve. “[The work we do] fulfills many needs,” Thompson explains. “It is rewarding and makes us feel useful and creative.” Mad Hatters accepts no dues and has one rule: no hats are ever sold for profit, they’re always gifted. And the group has no officers, just workers. “We have made our community a better place to live by helping people give to others,” Thompson says. For more information, or to learn how to get involved with Mad Hatters, please email Leal Thompson at <a target="_blank" href="mailto:[email protected]">[email protected]</a>.

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Investing in Turbulent Times

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Do you have your seat belts on? What a ride so far! You’ve enjoyed the exhilaration of the ride up and screamed through the gut wrenching sensation of being dropped. Now you’re just nauseated and want it all to come to an end so you can plant your feet firmly on the ground again. Sound familiar? For those long-term investors, this may be déjà vu – although the media would beg to differ, saying it's “different” this time. While the media provides a valuable service, we are in an age of over information. Too much information makes it difficult to decipher the good from the bad and the bad from the ugly. Besides, the information provided is usually based on a shorter-term perspective. Speaking of the media, remember: FEAR SELLS! Headlines are exactly that. There’s usually no room for optimism on the front page. So what is one to do? Warren Buffet puts it very aptly: “We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful.” Or to put it as John D. Rockefeller once said, “The way to make money is to buy when blood is running in the streets.” Well, the streets are turning red…And, an interesting point to note is that one contrarian indicator of the market is consumer sentiment. When it is at its lowest, that’s when opportunities abound. Unfortunately by that time, the masses are driven by panic and despair. While this is all great for investors sitting on the sidelines, what about the ones who are already invested? Here are some investment pointers to keep in check for those of you who are holding on tight. 1. Stay diversified. That is, assuming you already have a well-diversified portfolio between various asset classes. Staying the course in both good and bad times is usually recommended. Based on a study by research firm Dalbar, in the 20 years through 2006, the S&P 500 returned an average annualized return of 11.8 percent, whereas an average individual investor earned only 4.3 percent. The disparity is mostly from getting in and out of the market and missing out on the up-swings. 2. Don’t stop that dollar cost averaging. If you’re not doing it, start today. Remember, you’re buying shares on “sale” and hence, buying more shares with a constant dollar amount. 3. Stay with the investment objective. If investing for long term, think long term. In other words, focus on the forest, not on the trees. Nothing goes up forever. Neither does it go down forever. And no, the world is not coming to an end – although it may seem so nowadays. Stay invested. When the markets turn around, you want to be positioned to benefit from the up swing. 4. Get a portfolio check-up if you haven’t had one in a while. It may not be a bad idea to review investments every four to six months to ensure they are aligned to your goals. These few steps, as simple as they may sound, are easier said than done, but practice does make perfect! And finally, make sure your seat belts are on, and hold on for just a little longer. Rashida Lilani, CFP®, CMFC is with Lilani Wealth Management, located in Roseville. For more information or to contact Rashida, please call 916-782-7752 or visit lilaniwealthmanagement.com. Lilani Wealth Management is a Registered Investment Advisor. Securities offered through Foothill Securities Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC.

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Time To Vote

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Talking politics isn’t pretty. Issues get complicated, passions heat up and friends can get their…er…underthings in a wad rather quickly. You’d think it’d be easy, but it can be even more daunting to discuss politics with your kids. Let’s face it, some political campaigns make playground arguments look like elevated discussions of policy. But depending on how you look at it, it can pose a challenge or serve as an opportunity.Of course, the depth of the discussion will be determined by the age and maturity of the child. A five-year-old may simply want to know whom to root for, while a 15-year-old may want to learn more about a proposed property tax initiative for a new school, because her’s is overcrowded and the outcome will directly affect her. And, that depth will also be determined by your knowledge. If you find yourself saying, “go ask your mother/father,” maybe study up a little. A good starter resource is the Easy Voter Guide, published by the League of Women Voters. The League’s Lisa Fredrickson says it’s designed to be a CliffsNotes of sorts for voters. “It’s written very simply. Our effort is to try to take the highlights (of each candidate and issue), provide a basic overview and refer people to where they can get more information,” says Frederickson. As for addressing an issue with your child, Fredrickson has her own approach. “Focus on an issue or two that gets your child’s attention. One of my daughters is very interested in the environment, so I’ll sit down and research with her, right down to finding the candidate who supports the issues that matter to her.” Some parents are quite politically aware, but that doesn’t mean that they have their kids watching Meet the Press and taking notes. Greg Jones is a member of the El Dorado Republican National Committee and volunteers for various campaigns, and for his 10 year-old and six year-old, the political tutorials from dad come sparingly. “My kids know that I’m involved in politics, but I try to let their interest evolve at its own rate,” says Jones. With as many things as a typical kid has going on in his or her life, Jones’ belief is to let them be interested in things at their own pace. Jones says, “If it’s politics one day and sports another, that’s fine. I never want to cram politics or anything down their throats.” For older kids, Syreeta Harada, a political science professor at Sierra College says a good approach is to show them “that politics are very much a part of their daily lives.” To illustrate this point, Harada gives students a handout that she says shows “from the time they awake to the sound of the garbage truck from the waste management government department, until they go to sleep, secure under the services provided by the local police department, their lives are intertwined with the government.”What about explaining the consistent chasm - like differences in opinion that pervade politics? Harada says parents should identify with their own family values and show how that leads to a decision to support one candidate or issue over another. But, she also says it’s important to demonstrate that perception matters. “Show children that one candidate isn’t necessarily better than another, but that they are both unique and have different perceptions on how to govern.” Ah, Good luck with that one!And if all else fails, try this simple suggestion from the Web site for New York University’s Child Study Center (aboutourkids.org), they say the best way to talk to kids about politics “is the same way you talk to them about any other subject: with understanding, patience, and encouragement to ask questions.”Come to think of it, that’s a good way for adults to talk about politics, too.

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