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Kaaren Poole

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Surrounded by pets and wildlife on her 10 acres in Diamond Springs, artist Kaaren Poole does what she says she was meant to do; she creates art that embodies her love of animals.Though she created paintings and drawings in the past, her current medium is wearable art in the form of polymer clay jewelry. While she makes some pieces almost exclusively from clay, her favorites are necklaces with clay animal heads, elaborate backgrounds and bead or gemstone accents. “The subject I most enjoy is animals,” says Poole, who remembers drawing horses during math class in elementary school. “I’ve always been interested in art.”A career in the information technology department of Kaiser Permanente forced Poole to pursue art as a hobby, but she was able to keep her hand in it by traveling to Arizona once a year for 10 years to attend workshops. When her husband died after a long illness four years ago, Poole knew she had to find a way to fill her time, and she chose to do it with art and wild animal rescue.She joined Sierra Wildlife Rescue as a volunteer five years ago, working on the Squirrel Team. It wasn’t long before she got involved in rescuing water fowl and crows as well. This year alone, she rehabilitated around 18 ducks on her property until they could be released back into the wild. In addition to the myriad squirrels, waterfowl and crows passing through her care, she has her own animals, currently numbering nine cats, three dogs and five ducks.Cats happen to be some of her favorite animals, but pose an unlikely challenge to her. “Even though I have nine cats I look at every day, they elude me,” she says with a laugh at her inability thus far to capture their likeness in polymer clay.It’s possible that she is being a little hard on herself. After all, she only started working in polymer clay recently, when a friend at a local bead shop showed her a book about it. She enrolled in an online course, but got so caught up in pursuing her own work that she didn’t even finish the class project.Her polymer clay work really took off in March, and one of her pieces, MacGregor’s Garden, a necklace with a rabbit in a vegetable garden, is one of the finalists in Bead and Button magazine’s Bead Dreams contest and can be seen in this month’s issue. Poole also teaches one-day classes on polymer clay at Basically Beads in Diamond Springs. Visit basicallybeads.com for information on upcoming classes. In addition to teaching, Poole has also written four books on how to draw and paint birds, landscapes and animals.Poole says she is looking into showing some of her work in galleries, but for the time being, you can find her work at wildharestudio.org. Poole also donates the proceeds of her sales to animal charities, another way in which her two loves are able to work together.

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Curb Cravings

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

In this sluggish housing market, we know that buyers can afford to be choosy. The slightest thing can make all the difference to a homebuyer these days. So if you’re looking to sell, or simply to do your part to make your neighborhood a little snazzier, improving your curb appeal is just the thing to do.Erin Attardi, Executive Associate Realtor for Lyon Real Estate has sold many homes in Roseville and Folsom areas. “Buyers make an emotional connection with the home they ultimately purchase and want to see themselves living there,” she says. “If a buyer is turned off by the home’s exterior appearance, they immediately think that [it is a] reflection of the interior’s condition.”The exterior may be the last thing on a seller’s priority list of updates to be made before putting their home on the market, but the importance of curb appeal should not be underestimated. “I have had buyers in my car ask me to keep driving when we have pulled up to a home with an unkempt front yard. The interior could have been spotless, but those buyers would have never known,” Attardi adds.With so many more homes that on the market that meet a buyer’s specifications, enhanced curb appeal could give your home an edge over those that are not as appealing upon first glance.Rest assured, though, there are several things a homeowner can do to improve the first impression of potential buyers. If you have no idea where to start, the experts suggest figuring out a budget first. “Creating a master plan will allow you to phase the work as time and your budget will allow,” explains Jeff Ambrosia, principal at Yamasaki Landscape Architects in Auburn. “A licensed landscape contractor can walk you through the process and help you anticipate your needs and desires. They will then put this information to paper and create a set of landscape construction documents that will allow you successfully send your project out to bid to contractors,” Ambrosia says.If you’re more inclined to do-it-yourself projects, cleaning up your home’s exterior doesn’t need to be a chore. According to Debby Evans, owner and principal designer of Folsom’s Debby Evans Garden Designs, “If you will be doing the work yourself, there are many worthy Websites and periodicals that illustrate how to spruce up a garden. The Master Gardener Association of Sacramento County is very helpful,” she says.The easiest approach? Prune overgrown trees and shrubs, pull the weeds, and mow and edge the lawn. As trivial as that may seem, simple yard maintenance can make a tremendous difference in attracting buyers and make a good first impression. Kiel Myers, owner and president of Myers Landscape, Inc. in Folsom suggests updating the look of the yard.  “Many yards that are overgrown and/or outdated can be spruced up with a clean up, new plant selections, and new bark mulch,” he says.  Plus clearing and trimming allows more light to shine in the yard, which helps to give off an airy, bright, welcoming feeling to visitors and potential buyers.Some other easy fixes:  power-wash the driveway, front walkways, and front siding of your home.  Plant colorful flowers, replace existing exterior lights with new, contemporary fixtures on either side of the garage and on the front porch near the door.  Consider adding landscape lighting to accent all your hard work. And of course, if time allows, a fresh coat of paint couldn’t hurt.  With a little effort, increasing your curb appeal can be an easy, effective way to give your home the edge it needs to sell.

Read More »
Curb Cravings

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

In this sluggish housing market, we know that buyers can afford to be choosy. The slightest thing can make all the difference to a homebuyer these days. So if you’re looking to sell, or simply to do your part to make your neighborhood a little snazzier, improving your curb appeal is just the thing to do.Erin Attardi, Executive Associate Realtor for Lyon Real Estate has sold many homes in Roseville and Folsom areas. “Buyers make an emotional connection with the home they ultimately purchase and want to see themselves living there,” she says. “If a buyer is turned off by the home’s exterior appearance, they immediately think that [it is a] reflection of the interior’s condition.”The exterior may be the last thing on a seller’s priority list of updates to be made before putting their home on the market, but the importance of curb appeal should not be underestimated. “I have had buyers in my car ask me to keep driving when we have pulled up to a home with an unkempt front yard. The interior could have been spotless, but those buyers would have never known,” Attardi adds.With so many more homes that on the market that meet a buyer’s specifications, enhanced curb appeal could give your home an edge over those that are not as appealing upon first glance.Rest assured, though, there are several things a homeowner can do to improve the first impression of potential buyers. If you have no idea where to start, the experts suggest figuring out a budget first. “Creating a master plan will allow you to phase the work as time and your budget will allow,” explains Jeff Ambrosia, principal at Yamasaki Landscape Architects in Auburn. “A licensed landscape contractor can walk you through the process and help you anticipate your needs and desires. They will then put this information to paper and create a set of landscape construction documents that will allow you successfully send your project out to bid to contractors,” Ambrosia says.If you’re more inclined to do-it-yourself projects, cleaning up your home’s exterior doesn’t need to be a chore. According to Debby Evans, owner and principal designer of Folsom’s Debby Evans Garden Designs, “If you will be doing the work yourself, there are many worthy Websites and periodicals that illustrate how to spruce up a garden. The Master Gardener Association of Sacramento County is very helpful,” she says.The easiest approach? Prune overgrown trees and shrubs, pull the weeds, and mow and edge the lawn. As trivial as that may seem, simple yard maintenance can make a tremendous difference in attracting buyers and make a good first impression. Kiel Myers, owner and president of Myers Landscape, Inc. in Folsom suggests updating the look of the yard. “Many yards that are overgrown and/or outdated can be spruced up with a clean up, new plant selections, and new bark mulch,” he says. Plus clearing and trimming allows more light to shine in the yard, which helps to give off an airy, bright, welcoming feeling to visitors and potential buyers.Some other easy fixes: power-wash the driveway, front walkways, and front siding of your home. Plant colorful flowers, replace existing exterior lights with new, contemporary fixtures on either side of the garage and on the front porch near the door. Consider adding landscape lighting to accent all your hard work. And of course, if time allows, a fresh coat of paint couldn’t hurt. With a little effort, increasing your curb appeal can be an easy, effective way to give your home the edge it needs to sell.

Read More »
2008 Readers' Choice Awards

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

The number of votes and results show an overwhelming trend: Style readers are passionate about their favorites! You’ve voted and we’ve tallied. There’s everything from favorite place to get a burger to favorite local hero, and we’ve got the standouts…plus a few Editors’ Picks to give you even more of the inside scoop! Congrats to all the winners!Favorite Ice Cream/Frozen Treat Place1. Big Spoon2. Cold Stone3. A Dash of PanacheFavorite Smoothie Place1. Jamba Juice2. Robek’s3. A Dash of PanacheFavorite Pizza Place1. Round Table2. Pizza Antica3. Cool RiverEditor’s Pick: Basic Urban KitchenFavorite Breakfast Place1. Venita Rhea’s2. Susie’s Country Oaks Café3. Pacific Street CaféFavorite Brunch Place1. Toast2. La Provence3. SpoonsFavorite Burger & Fries Joint1. The Habit2. In-n-Out3. Mel’s DinerFavorite BBQ Place1. Lucille’s Smokehouse2. Texas West BBQ3. Back Forty Texas BBQFavorite Mexican Restaurant1. Cabos2. Chevy’s3. Dos CoyotesHonorable mentions – Eva’s and El Azteca – the votes were very close in this category. Guess we all love our Mexican food!Favorite Chinese Restaurant1. Fat’s Asia Bistro2. P.F. Chang’s3. Granite Bay ChineseFavorite Sushi/Japanese Restaurant1. Mikuni2. Sushi Unlimited3. Blue NamiFavorite Steakhouse1. Ruth’s Chris2. Outback3. Carver’sEditor’s Pick: Austin’s SteakhouseFavorite Italian Restaurant1. Macaroni Grill2. Olive Garden3. Buca di BepoFavorite Indian Restaurant1. Bombay Bistro2. Chaat Café3. Kathmandu KitchenFavorite Thai1. Thai Basil2. Ruan Thai3. Granite Bay Thai BistroFavorite Deli1. Beach Hut Deli2. Dominick’s Italian Market-Deli3. Fosco’sFavorite Sandwich Place1. Jersey Mike’s2. Beach Hut Deli3. Mr. Pickles Favorite Salad Place1. A Dash of Panache2. Pluto’s3. Fresh Choice Favorite Bakery 1. Dainty Pastry2. House of Bread3. Cinn CityFavorite Romantic Restaurant1. La Provence2. Hawks3. The Melting PotFavorite Outdoor Dining1. Greenhouse Restaurant & Brewery2. La Provence3. ToastFavorite Takeout Restaurant1. Pei Wei2. Chili’s3. Dominick’s Italian Market-DeliFavorite Casual Restaurant1. BJ’s2. Applebee’s3. Pasta VillageFavorite Overall Restaurant1. La Provence2. Paul Martin’s American Bistro3. Piatti Favorite Waitperson1. Lindsay, La Provence2. Sandra, A Dash of Panache3. Ignacio, Piatti Favorite Coffee or Tea1. Starbucks2. Peet’s3. It’s a GrindEditor’s Pick: A Perfect BlendFavorite Bar1. Mandango’s2. Crush 293. BJ’sFavorite Happy Hour1. Chevy’s2. Crush 293. PiattiFavorite Cocktails1. Crush 292. La Provence3. Fat’s Asia BistroFavorite Place for a Glass of Wine1. Crush 292. La Provence3. WineStylesEditor’s Pick: Carpe Vino Favorite Bartender1. Tony, La Provence2. Paul, La Provence3. Page, Piatti Favorite Local Winery1. Mt. Vernon2. Boeger3. Lava CapFavorite Day Trip1. Napa2. Lake Tahoe3. San FranciscoFavorite Playground1. Royer Park2. Hillsborough Park3. Maidu ParkFavorite Kid’s Activity1. Sunsplash2. Roseville Aquatic Center3. Tricks GymnasticsFavorite Park1. Royer Park2. Maidu Park3. Hillsborough Park Favorite Picnic Spot1. Royer Park2. Beale’s Point3. Lake TahoeFavorite Golf Course1. Woodcreek Oaks2. Whitney Oaks3. Diamond OaksEditor’s Pick: DarkHorse Favorite Personal Trainer1. Suzanne Moen, Roseville Health & Wellness2. Sandee Darragh, Johnson Ranch3. Breann Zweck, Roseville Health & Wellness Favorite Gym/Health Club1. Roseville Health & Wellness2. Johnson Ranch3. Gold’s GymFavorite Martial Arts1. Kovar’s2. Joslin’s East West Karate3. Granite Bay KarateFavorite Casino1. Thunder Valley2. Atlantis Casino3. Harrah’s Lake TahoeFavorite Local Spiritual Leader1. Ray Johnston, Bayside Church2. Lance Hahn, Bridgeway Christian3. Chris Ritter, Providence Bible ChurchFavorite Museum1. Crocker Art Museum2. Railroad Museum3. Roseville Telephone Museum Favorite Local Hero1. Leslie DeDora, A Touch of Understanding2. Robyn Rapheal, Keaton Rapheal Memorial3. Local Firefighters Favorite Civic Leader1. The late Sylvia Besana2. Gina Garbolino3. Ed BonnerFavorite Local Businessperson1. Sharon Brown, Bright Beginnings2. Scott Alvord, A Dash of Panache3. Joyce Falbo, The Versa GroupFavorite Annual Event or Festival1. Downtown Tuesday Night2. Hot Chili & Cool Cars3. Roseville’s 4th of July FestivitiesFavorite Artist1. Gail Rappaport-Weiland2. Mya Louw3. Diana BrownFavorite Musician/Band1. Lincoln Brewster2. Mumbo Gumbo3. Val Weinberg Favorite Performing Arts Organization1. Magic Circle Theatre2. B Street Theatre3. Auburn SymphonyFavorite Charitable Organization1. Placer SPCA2. Acres of Hope3. A Touch of UnderstandingFavorite Best Kept Secret1. Mozie’s Adventures2. Providence Bible Church3. A Dash of PanacheFavorite Teacher1. Dani Guzman, Granite Bay High School2. Alejandro Uribe, Roseville High School3. Katrina Wachs, Granite Bay High School Favorite Athletic Coach1. Ernie Cooper, Granite Bay High School2. Bri Larson, Granite Bay High School3. Guin Boggs, Triple Threat Basketball Sports CampFavorite Place to Volunteer1. Placer SPCA2. Bayside Church3. Acres of HopeFavorite Place to Take Out-of-Town Visitors1. Old Sacramento2. Old Town Auburn3. Denio’sFavorite Web Site1. Roseville.ca.us2. Craigslist.com3. Rocklintoday.comFavorite Barber1. American Male2. Perry’s Barbershop3. Glenn’s Barber ShopFavorite Hair Stylist1. Christy Hutchison, J. Christiaan2. Erica Parce, Nevaeh3. Amy Freeman, TeezedEditor’s Pick: Bryan Barnes, Nevaeh Favorite Salon1. J. Christiaan Spa Salon2. Nevaeh3. Halo Salon & SpaEditor’s Pick: Atrium Salon & Spa Favorite Place for a Manicure/Pedicure1. Bellagio Day Spa & Salon2. Bellezza Nail Spa3. Renaissance NailsFavorite Place for a Massage1. Massage Envy2. Atrium Salon & Spa3. Serenity SpaEditor’s Note – very close 4th and 5th places: Nevaeh and J. ChristiaanFavorite Place for a Facial1. Serenity Spa2. Atrium Salon & Spa3. TTE SkincareFavorite Pet Groomer1. Granite Bay Groomers2. PetsMart3. Karona’s Pet Styling Favorite Florist1. Bartlett’s Flowers & Gifts2. Lilygrass3. Becky’s FlowersFavorite Photographer1. Nor Cal Candids2. Mike Martin Photography3. McKay PhotographyFavorite Art Gallery1. Blue Line Gallery2. Crocker Art Museum3. Hang It Up GalleryFavorite Local Bank1. Wells Fargo2. Bank of America3. Safe Credit UnionEditor’s Pick: 1st Northern BankFavorite Auto Repair1. 5 Star Automotive2. Made in Japan3. Duncan’s AutomotiveFavorite Dry Cleaner1. Bud’s Dry Cleaning2. Judi’s Cleaners3. Rytina Fine CleanersFavorite Tailor1. Four Seasons Tailoring2. Anthony’s Tailor3. Alterations ExpressFavorite Dentist1. Frederick Correa, DDS2. Dental Designs3. Jerry Martin, DDSFavorite Produce Department1. Raley’s2. Nugget Market3. SafewayEditor’s Pick: Denio’s Farmer’s MarketFavorite Grocery Store1. Raley’s2. Nugget Market3. SafewayFavorite Boutique1. Nevaeh2. Friday Nite3. Nice Twice Favorite Children’s Store1. Lil Suckers2. Silver Spoon3. Starlight StarbrightEditor’s Pick: Toys That TeachFavorite Gift Shop1. J. Matthews2. Periwinkle3. Le Petit ChateauEditor’s Pick: Home Gift ArtFavorite Jewelry Store1. Kenny G & Co.2. DeVons3. GuzzettaFavorite Store in Which to Shop1. Nordstrom2. Target3. Macy’sFavorite Mall or Shopping Center1. Roseville Galleria2. The Fountains3. Quarry Ponds

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Margot Comer

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Margot Comer’s insightful kindergarten teacher confided in her father, “Don’t expect too much of her…she’ll be an artist.” The teacher had it half right; Comer turned out to be an artist. However, ask her students and members of the local art scene and they will say that she has given so much of herself along the way. She was always interested in art and made her passion into her profession. After finishing school in Boston she made her way across the United States to California and started a graphic arts business. She retired 30 years later and decided to pursue painting by studying, refining her craft, with fellow painters throughout California and Mexico. Her subjects are varied but one of her favorite methods is the “plein air” approach, which is a French term meaning “in the open air.” Working in nature, painters must learn to interpret continual changing light and conditions. “When you paint outdoors,” says Comer; “you have to challenge yourself beyond what you already know.” By seeing her work you can tell that she revels in it. She is also influenced by the paintings of the late Russian Impressionist Sergei Bongart. His stylistic influences jump off Comer’s canvases as a celebration of color. She is now a teacher and beloved mentor holding classes at Sierra College, Sun City Roseville and the Maidu Center. “I love getting an idea and expressing it in paint,” says Comer, “and, I equally enjoy helping students do the same.”One of those lucky students is retired art teacher Dennis Carr, who holds two masters degrees in fine arts and is accomplished in many types of art forms. Yet, he never studied painting. After seeing a display of Comer’s work at the Sun City Roseville Fine Arts Club, he decided to join her class. He enjoys her relaxed teaching style. “She’s a delightful gal,” says Carr. “[She] has a way of bringing out the best effort in people of all ages.” Locally, Comer’s work has been recognized and spotlighted by some big names. SureWest chose one of her paintings, Roseville Depot, for the cover of the 2007 Roseville telephone book. Sacramento-based PBS station KVIE chose her work for their on-air charity auction last year, and will do so again this year. Comer is also affiliated with Noel Flynn Gallery in Roseville where her work is available to view and purchase. Owner and fellow artist, Noel Flynn, has been a friend and business associate to Comer for more than three years. He is impressed by her color usage and excellent composition. “She has mastered the medium,” says Flynn.When not teaching, she is busy creating her own masterpieces. “When I am in my studio, I become completely absorbed in my work and give it 100 percent of my focus.” Comer explains, “It is truly my passion.” During her long and varied career Comer has painted hundreds of paintings and says, “I have covered acres of canvas, one brush stroke at a time.” For more information or to view more of Comer’s work, visit mcomerpaintings.com.

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Time To Vote

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Talking politics isn’t pretty. Issues get complicated, passions heat up and friends can get their…er…underthings in a wad rather quickly. You’d think it’d be easy, but it can be even more daunting to discuss politics with your kids. Let’s face it, some political campaigns make playground arguments look like elevated discussions of policy. But depending on how you look at it, it can pose a challenge or serve as an opportunity.Of course, the depth of the discussion will be determined by the age and maturity of the child. A five-year-old may simply want to know whom to root for, while a 15-year-old may want to learn more about a proposed property tax initiative for a new school, because her’s is overcrowded and the outcome will directly affect her. And, that depth will also be determined by your knowledge. If you find yourself saying, “go ask your mother/father,” maybe study up a little. A good starter resource is the Easy Voter Guide, published by the League of Women Voters. The League’s Lisa Fredrickson says it’s designed to be a CliffsNotes of sorts for voters. “It’s written very simply. Our effort is to try to take the highlights (of each candidate and issue), provide a basic overview and refer people to where they can get more information,” says Frederickson. As for addressing an issue with your child, Fredrickson has her own approach. “Focus on an issue or two that gets your child’s attention. One of my daughters is very interested in the environment, so I’ll sit down and research with her, right down to finding the candidate who supports the issues that matter to her.” Some parents are quite politically aware, but that doesn’t mean that they have their kids watching Meet the Press and taking notes. Greg Jones is a member of the El Dorado Republican National Committee and volunteers for various campaigns, and for his 10 year-old and six year-old, the political tutorials from dad come sparingly. “My kids know that I’m involved in politics, but I try to let their interest evolve at its own rate,” says Jones. With as many things as a typical kid has going on in his or her life, Jones’ belief is to let them be interested in things at their own pace. Jones says, “If it’s politics one day and sports another, that’s fine. I never want to cram politics or anything down their throats.” For older kids, Syreeta Harada, a political science professor at Sierra College says a good approach is to show them “that politics are very much a part of their daily lives.” To illustrate this point, Harada gives students a handout that she says shows “from the time they awake to the sound of the garbage truck from the waste management government department, until they go to sleep, secure under the services provided by the local police department, their lives are intertwined with the government.”What about explaining the consistent chasm - like differences in opinion that pervade politics? Harada says parents should identify with their own family values and show how that leads to a decision to support one candidate or issue over another. But, she also says it’s important to demonstrate that perception matters. “Show children that one candidate isn’t necessarily better than another, but that they are both unique and have different perceptions on how to govern.” Ah, Good luck with that one!And if all else fails, try this simple suggestion from the Web site for New York University’s Child Study Center (aboutourkids.org), they say the best way to talk to kids about politics “is the same way you talk to them about any other subject: with understanding, patience, and encouragement to ask questions.”Come to think of it, that’s a good way for adults to talk about politics, too.

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Curb Cravings

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

In this sluggish housing market, we know that buyers can afford to be choosy. The slightest thing can make all the difference to a homebuyer these days. So if you’re looking to sell, or simply to do your part to make your neighborhood a little snazzier, improving your curb appeal is just the thing to do.Erin Attardi, Executive Associate Realtor for Lyon Real Estate has sold many homes in Roseville and Folsom areas. “Buyers make an emotional connection with the home they ultimately purchase and want to see themselves living there,” she says. “If a buyer is turned off by the home’s exterior appearance, they immediately think that [it is a] reflection of the interior’s condition.”The exterior may be the last thing on a seller’s priority list of updates to be made before putting their home on the market, but the importance of curb appeal should not be underestimated. “I have had buyers in my car ask me to keep driving when we have pulled up to a home with an unkempt front yard. The interior could have been spotless, but those buyers would have never known,” Attardi adds.With so many more homes that on the market that meet a buyer’s specifications, enhanced curb appeal could give your home an edge over those that are not as appealing upon first glance.Rest assured, though, there are several things a homeowner can do to improve the first impression of potential buyers. If you have no idea where to start, the experts suggest figuring out a budget first. “Creating a master plan will allow you to phase the work as time and your budget will allow,” explains Jeff Ambrosia, principal at Yamasaki Landscape Architects in Auburn. “A licensed landscape contractor can walk you through the process and help you anticipate your needs and desires. They will then put this information to paper and create a set of landscape construction documents that will allow you successfully send your project out to bid to contractors,” Ambrosia says.If you’re more inclined to do-it-yourself projects, cleaning up your home’s exterior doesn’t need to be a chore. According to Debby Evans, owner and principal designer of Folsom’s Debby Evans Garden Designs, “If you will be doing the work yourself, there are many worthy Websites and periodicals that illustrate how to spruce up a garden. The Master Gardener Association of Sacramento County is very helpful,” she says.The easiest approach? Prune overgrown trees and shrubs, pull the weeds, and mow and edge the lawn. As trivial as that may seem, simple yard maintenance can make a tremendous difference in attracting buyers and make a good first impression. Kiel Myers, owner and president of Myers Landscape, Inc. in Folsom suggests updating the look of the yard. “Many yards that are overgrown and/or outdated can be spruced up with a clean up, new plant selections, and new bark mulch,” he says. Plus clearing and trimming allows more light to shine in the yard, which helps to give off an airy, bright, welcoming feeling to visitors and potential buyers.Some other easy fixes: power-wash the driveway, front walkways, and front siding of your home. Plant colorful flowers, replace existing exterior lights with new, contemporary fixtures on either side of the garage and on the front porch near the door. Consider adding landscape lighting to accent all your hard work. And of course, if time allows, a fresh coat of paint couldn’t hurt. With a little effort, increasing your curb appeal can be an easy, effective way to give your home the edge it needs to sell.

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Portland

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

Portland – Oregon’s eco-centric green city – is but an hour away by plane, which is a far less expensive way to travel north these days. Upon arrival, expect the unexpected…and a little something more. Portland has culture, character and camaraderie typical of smaller towns; traits that make it stand apart from others of similar and larger size. Saddled with the near impossible task of trying to narrow down style’s five favorite things about Portland, we gave it an admirable go. Why shouldn’t you?ALBERTA STREETIf antsy for artistic inspiration, head to gallery-rich Alberta Street. This once sketchy district has been revitalized by the vibrant work of Portland’s craftiest. A number of galleries house garden art and fiber arts, watercolors, photography, metal work, jewelry and more. Alberta Street is also a great place to grab a refreshing salad, a steaming cup of coffee and a seat on the curb to listen to whatever musician happens to be yodeling there at the time. portlandneighborhood.com. style tip: Fly into town at the end of the month for Last Thursday Art Walk; vendor mayhem included. For more about Portland, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Blazing Heroes

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

On July third, I hiked with my son to the top of Mt. Tallac, above Lake Tahoe. From our 9,700-foot vantage point we could see 360 degrees. It was beautifully clear and the lake below us glimmered like an alpine sea. But above us, angel-hair wisps of smoke drifted like cobwebs along the jet stream and to the north a hundred miles or so, a great industrial-sized column of smoke billowed from the hills of Butte County. West of us, in the Desolation Wilderness, Pyramid Peak rose starkly against a sky jaundiced from fires in the American River Canyon. It would be the last nice day we’d have for a while.As I write, it is now mid-July and our air is filled with a choking yellow haze. The smoke from those fires, and others, collects in the valley like a searing fog. It stings the eyes, scratches the throat, and turns anything more than a hundred yards away into ethereal smudges. Like a skein of oil on the surface of water, it seems to settle the very air that carries it. A lid of heat holds it all down and inside we cook. In the foothills it’s worse: the honey-colored haze is sticky and thick among stands of oaks. It doesn’t just dissolve whole ridges, it erases entire mountains.  In those mountains, fire crews battle. There are thousands from all across the country and fire stations just down the street. Dressed in lemon yellow and armed with hoses, chainsaws, shovels and bulldozers, and supported from the air by nimble helicopters and lumbering C-130 tanker planes, they climb into the fire, stomping up steep slopes at high elevation, sometimes bearing packs weighing sixty pounds. They drink gallons of water and burn up to 7,000 calories a day. They are streaked with sweat, dirt, grime and soot. They watch for rattlesnakes and poison oak and tree branch torches that burn free from their trunks and fall without warning. They watch the wind, wary of any sudden gusts or unexpected eddies that could rouse the flames and quickly whip them into a life-threatening frenzy. These men and women are scratched and bruised and fatigued to their core. But still they fight, because it’s what they do and it’s what they love. When you live down here among the stoplights, cul-de-sacs and shopping plazas, the wilderness we visit only in the best conditions can become abstract and taken for granted. Now, as it burns and the smoke fills our streets and our lungs, we are reminded once again that all of us—man, beast, and sugar pine forest—are connected.Firefighters, like soldiers and police officers, belong to a profession that we too easily take for granted, until they’re needed. And too often we fail to pay proper tribute unless tragedy strikes.A few weeks after writing the initial portion of this essay, the worst happened and nine firefighters were killed in a helicopter accident in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. Days before that, two other firefighters lost their lives. Our hearts go out to their families. Our gratitude resides with their memories.In this issue, we celebrate the best this region has to offer. I hope in some small way this piece serves to pay proper homage to the men and women who risked everything to step into the ring of fire this long, hot combustible summer.  Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1 KNCI.

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Style Magazine
Local Area Tidbits

Sep 30, 2008 05:00PM ● By Super Admin

This issue marks the fourth anniversary of our Readers’ Choice Awards – inside you’ll find your top picks for community businesses, figures and organizations. Look out for piano retailer Sherman Clay, new to Roseville as of September, and Sonoma County eatery Johnny Garlic’s, opening in Roseville this month… There’s twice the reason to head out to The Greenhouse restaurant in Roseville for great brew. Not only is it one of the few organic microbreweries in the nation, but the Brewmaster is one of only 23 Supreme Master Brew judges in the world! …How well do you know your community athletes? The Sierra College Wolverine Athletic Association is holding a “Search for Elusive Wolverines” contest until October 15th. Entrants must submit photo or video evidence of a “Wolverine Sighting”– a glimpse of a Sierra College athletic alumnus, the name of the alumnus and the sport he or she played at Sierra College, to compete. The contestant who sends in the most sightings will receive a $100 cash prize and two passes for all sporting events for the upcoming year. For more information or to submit an entry, e-mail Susanne Michaels at [email protected] you been to Old Town Roseville lately? The words “cool” and “urban” may not have been associated with this part of town in the past, but stop by Basic Urban Kitchen and see one of the resasons Old Town is helping to put “urban” back into suburban.…Congratulations to novelist Jennifer Martin, who was awarded the Moondance International Film Festival’s Columbine award for her screenplay, The Hunatics Club. The award is presented to an author whose work promotes non-violence and alternatives to violent conflict resolution…The philanthropic spirit of the Rotary Club of Roseville doesn’t just serve our own community – it extends beyond our nation’s borders! The Rotary Club recently donated an ambulance to the Mexican Red Cross…Nominees for the Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance’s Elly Awards were announced – the Theatre at Granite Bay received two nominations, Woodcreek High School, Whitney High School, and Auburn’s Music and More Arts Academy and Theatre each received six, Oakmont High School received seven, and Roseville’s Magic Circle Theatre received 20. Bravo! Check out the results at sarta.com...It’s October and time to break out the jack-o-lanterns, scarecrows and mountains of candy corn! Parents can bring kids aged 12 and under to Sunset Center Main Hall in Rocklin for a safe alternative to trick-or-treating. Kids will enjoy prizes, games, bounce houses and goody bags. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 916-625-5200 or visit rocklin.ca.gov...In the “oops, we’re-only-human” department, we must note that the photo for Granito’s A Garlic Experience Chef Daniel Seifried in our July issue’s Dish was incorrect. Take a look in the October issue for the correct photograph, and stop by Granito’s to taste Chef Daniel’s delights. That’s all for now, but check in next month as we ring in the holiday season with our annual Thanksgiving issue! Do you have newsworthy tidbits for our What's Up column? Send it to us at [email protected]

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