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Last Updated: May 31, 2008 05:00PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

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May 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

Davey “Doc” Wiser is a charming Placerville resident and icon. For 31 years he has been involved with the Highway 50 Association, a non-profit organization dedicated to recreating the early pioneer days designed for horse and wagon enthusiasts. The 59th Annual Wagon Train event, featuring California and Nevada’s oldest authentic wagon train, includes travels across California and Nevada. Davey loves to have a good time driving his stagecoach and riding the Pony Express, which yes, still runs deliveries for the right price. Davey even offers free stagecoach rides for the community, on select dates. He is very involved in the heart of Placerville by volunteering at local fundraisers. He loves chocolate candy (See’s to be exact!) with Madera wine and the calamari at Dante’s on the River. Don’t look for him online; when asked for his email address he replied, “I don’t have that, I’m just an old cowboy.” It’s great to see there are still folks with that good old-fashioned philosophy who can have just as much fun (maybe more, to hear Davey’s stories) without modern luxuries. For more information about the 59th Annual Highway 50 historic event, visit hwy50wagontrain.com. For more on Davey "Doc" Wiser, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email Gloria Schroeder at [email protected], or call her at 916-988-9888 x116.

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Senior Funtime Band

May 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

About three years ago, community leader, Moni Gilmore, had an inspired idea – why not bring together a bunch of musically inclined local seniors and form a volunteer band? Turns out, Gilmore was no stranger to senior programs either. She held many positions in local government, including the fire department, and was instrumental in the process of converting the old fire station into the now, El Dorado Hills Senior Center. With that feat behind her, she decided to turn her attention to music. Sadly, Moni Gilmore passed away in April of this year, but her dream lives on in the Senior Funtime Band.After running a few articles in the local newspapers, the band began to take shape. Soon enough, the band was performing at local venues and events, entertaining mostly seniors with some of their favorite melodies. Toes were tappin’, hands were clappin’ and the band became an instant crowd favorite. The band consists of seven dedicated members, each with their own musical forte. The bandleader, Al Kolthoff, a retired software developer, plays guitar. Leading the band in vocals is Connie Backers, who spent half of her life in law enforcement and the other half as a nurse. According to Kolthoff, Bob Hoffman plays the same trumpet that he did in high school. “He is now 70 and has the nickname Hercules, because he can easily lift one of our speakers, one-handed at 70 pounds each,” boasts Kolthoff. About 20 years ago, Frank Larossi became paralyzed from the waist down from a spider bite, but that doesn’t stop him from playing a mean saxophone tune. Eric Phillips, a retired geologist, not only sings and plays the banjo, he also enjoys sharing his knowledge and experience with other local seniors. Rounding out the band are Lori Hovestandt, a keyboardist who played the piano and organ all of her life, and Laura Iarossi, a sound mixer, who up until three years ago had no prior experience.When this gifted crew gets together and performs, it’s a nostalgic journey though jazz and big band songbooks of the 20s, 30s and 40s. Some of their favorite and most requested tunes include “Dream,” “Goody Goody,” “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore,” “Lazy River,” “Ain’t She Sweet,” “My Blue Heaven,” and “Ain’t Misbehavin’,” to name a few.The Senior Funtime Band performs a concert on the last Friday of each month at 1 p.m., at the El Dorado Senior Center. Their summer schedule includes a performance on June 4, at the El Dorado Hills Library (open to all ages), and a gig at the annual Seniors Fourth of July Celebration.“Our goals are to have fun playing music and to entertain seniors, and to do so on a volunteer basis,” says Kolthoff. Judging from the great chemistry that these band members have on stage, it’s safe to say this group is hitting all the right notes and having a ball doing it. •ARTSBEAT:Through July 11 – Shadows of the Past. Enjoy works from watercolor artist Kara Castro and photography by George and Jo Ann Aiello on exhibit at The Gallery at 48 Natoma. 916-355-7285.Through July 27 –The Language of the Nude: Four Centuries of Drawing the Human Body. This exhibition brings nearly 60 rarely seen drawings to the Crocker Art Museum. For details on this exhibit or for more information, call 916-808-7000 or visit crockerartmuseum.org.

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True Colors

May 31, 2008 ● By Super Admin

According to scientific definition, the color we see is the effect that light of varying wavelengths and frequencies has on our eye and the optical nerves. Applying that definition to something like a rainbow is kind of depressing. It’s like the “no Santa Claus” theory of Christmas – it just sucks the fun right out. Science aside, color is fun and dramatic, and we use it to tell ourselves all kinds of things. Consider the meanings we give to roses – white for apology, red for love, yellow for jealousy. Or the way color can be used to express emotion in art. Or, to encourage a certain type of mood, your interior design colors orchestrate this example. Red is thought to bring energy and warmth, where green is seen to be relaxing; yellow is cheerful; and blue is cool and calming. Anecdotal stories about the emotional effects of color are pretty eyebrow raising. Years ago I read about a color called “Baker’s Pink,” supposedly used in insane asylums in the 1920s for its calming effect on patients. Legend has it that the color had the complete opposite effect, bringing on violent reactions among the patients, and consequently the use and manufacturing of the color was hastily discontinued (and let’s face it, painting any room pink is really just asking for trouble).Whether the effect of color on our moods is real or imagined, it’s a pleasant way to view the world. Sure, it’s just light reflecting off our brain or whatever, but that doesn’t mean we can’t believe in our own “color Santa.” With the growing popularity of personal development in careers and relationships, a number of organizations have started using color to identify personality types. (I’m purple. Can’t you tell?) One such organization is True Colors, Inc. (true-colors.com). True Colors applies colors (Blue, Gold, Green and Orange) to four basic personality types derived from existing psychological studies (in particular the work of clinical psychologist David Keirsey). Participants build their own ‘color spectrum’ based on their personality strengths and weaknesses, and the color spectrum can then be applied in larger ways to help determine a career or educational path. A program like True Colors allows participants to connect with their own strengths and weaknesses with a fun and entertaining approach that allows people to relax and better embrace new ideas. An approach like this is really a way to see your strengths with fresh eyes. True Colors has a career and educational focus, particularly beneficial to corporations, schools, government and non-profit organizations. True colors helps us to better understand our own personality needs and values, thus recognizing others’ personality traits. You can image how not only an understanding, but also an awareness of personality needs and values can positively impact a workplace, classroom or home environment. So if you’re feeling a little brown or gray, and need to find your inner orange, gold, green or blue, then maybe it’s time to seek out your inner rainbow and identify your own true colors. •THE COLORSOrange – Orange personalities act on a moment’s notice; are witty, charming and spontaneous. They consider life a game, and are impulsive and generous. Oranges need fun, variety, stimulation and excitement and are described as optimistic, eager and bold. They value skill, resourcefulness, and courage, and are natural trouble shooters, performers and competitors.Gold – Gold personalities follow the rules and respect authority. Always loyal, dependable and prepared, they have a strong sense of what is right and wrong in life. They need to be useful and to belong. Faithful and stable, sensible and organized, they value home, family and tradition. Those whose brightest color is gold are natural preservers, helpful, good citizens and are caring and concerned.Green – Green personalities seek knowledge and understanding as they are analytical and conceptual and live life by their own standards. Cool, calm and collected, they value intelligence, insight, fairness and justice. They are inventive, logical perfectionists who can think in the abstract, are investigative and hypothetical. Those who have green as their brightest color are natural non-conformists, visionaries and natural problem solvers.Blue – Blue personalities need to feel unique and authentic. They are enthusiastic, warm, compassionate, sympathetic and personal. In life they look for meaning and significance. Natural communicators, blue personalities are sincere and idealistic with a need to contribute, to encourage and to care. They value integrity and unity in relationships, are natural romantics and nurturers.*Printed with permission from True Colors, Inc.

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