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Camping 101

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Referring to his limited camping experience, a good friend once said, “Man spent 25,000 years perfecting shelter, who am I to turn my back on it?” But even he has been known to occasionally rough it in the wilderness (or, in his case, the state campground with showers). And he does it for the same reason as the rest of us: fresh air, tranquility, s’mores. Most of us really do get a sense of reconnecting to our past on some primal, subconscious level once the tent is up, the campfire has been stoked and the stars come out. And when we wake in the morning, all kinked up because the foam sleeping pad didn’t quite perform as advertised, we renew our appreciation for the aforementioned shelter our ancestors worked so hard to perfect.  There is no question that camping is a lot of work, especially with kids. In fact, my wife and I cut back when our kids were younger because we realized that all the packing, unpacking, and packing up again was being done by us, while they seemed to spend most of their time running around the campground stomping in poison oak, complaining about the potties or getting stung. They’re older now and we’ve eased back into it, but when it comes to camping with young kids, it can be a lot of work and part of you really has to want it. But want it you should, because in the Sierra, within easy reach of the 80 and 50 Corridors, are quite simply some of the best places to camp in America.“Roughing it” is a relative term, and a lot of camping hassles can be mitigated with one word: planning. The first order of business is to only pack what you truly need. Check the forecast, toss in an extra blanket or two if it looks particularly chilly – but leave the comforters at home. A good sleeping bag should be enough for most summertime conditions in the Sierra, especially if your SUV is parked five feet away. Clothing is another over-packed item. This isn’t a business trip. A change of clothes is fine but for the most part, it’s okay to wear the same hoodie a few days in a row. And plan out the menu ahead of time, you can get as fancy as you want – and plenty of people do – but know going in what your meals will be, so that you’ve used most of it up by the time you’re heading out.Cooking gear is another facet that is easy to overdo. Again, there are people who take their great outdoors gastronomy very seriously, and truly, I hope to camp next to them. But most of us don’t really need titanium-lined Dutch ovens or battery-operated margarita makers. Generally speaking, a small propane stove, a pan, a pot, a few cups and some simple utensils are fine. As for any rum drinks, serve them on the rocks. You’re already surrounded by them anyway, so it kind of fits with the theme.As for the rest of your gear, the world of camping equipment can be as humbling as the wilderness itself. So, if the only sleeping bag you have is the one with the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle lining that you took to camp back in ‘87, your next step is to find the right gear. To do that, don’t rush out to the local big box discount store the night before and buy up everything in aisle 344. You want quality, and the first time your waterproof tent is hammered by a cloudburst that the forecast didn’t call for, you’ll thank yourself. Of course, costs for quality can rise up faster than a Sierra thunderhead, so consider renting at first, rather than buying. Places like REI, Sports Chalet and locally-owned outdoorsy shops in the high country should have all the gear you need, and the rates are often quite reasonable. After a few trips you should have a pretty good idea of what works for you and what doesn’t. And by that time, it’s the off-season and the prices are lower!  So let’s say you’ve got all that taken care of. Now comes the fun part: where to go. Within a few hours of Roseville or Folsom there are literally more places than you could visit in a lifetime: Crystal Basin and Desolation Wildernesses, the American River Canyon, the Alp-like Sierra Buttes...it can quickly get confusing, so do a little research. The Forest Service and State Parks have invaluable resources online and links to still others. There are a lot of good books too, one of the best is by Tom Stienstra, an outdoors writer for the San Francisco Chronicle. His book, California Camping, is by far the most useful I’ve found on the subject. Granted, he lists a lot more than just places to camp in the greater Placer/El Dorado region, but from primitive to lavish, he reviews them all in plain, succinct detail.  One of things Stienstra mentions is the five percent rule, and it’s a good one to remember. One of the reasons we get away is to...get away. But we’re like-minded creatures, and that means we can end up trying to get away from it all, together. And that kind of defeats the purpose. The five percent rule, Stienstra writes, is “Ninety-five percent of vacationers use only five percent of the available recreation areas.” Most are heavily visited because of their convenience – either to the valley or to destinations like Lake Tahoe – or because of their amenities like flush toilets and showers. If you can forego either, you automatically increase your odds of enjoying a little solitude. Just be sure to choose from campsites up-wind of any pit toilets, if you can.     If you don’t mind crowds or are the impulsive, last-minute type, you should know that the most popular campgrounds fill up months in advance via a reservation system like Reserve America (reserveamerica.com) or recreation.gov, which is for campgrounds on federal land. Reserving a spot in January for a weekend in July is usually necessary. Most public campgrounds, state or federal, designate a certain number of campsites as first come, first served. And plenty don’t take reservations at all: PG&E operates a good number of campgrounds and according to their Web site pg&e.com/recreation – nearly all of their sites are first come, first served, with the exception of group facilities. But it is wise to check ahead, nonetheless. And for backcountry hiking, always check in advance about backcountry permits, which may be required.Of course, the biggest factor in deciding where to go is you. Wide open vistas or tranquil mountain forests? Fishing? Hiking? A pizza joint within delivery distance? Ask yourself and your family what sort of outdoor experience it is you’re looking for and narrow it down from there.Speaking of outdoor experience, one last thing: can you spot poison oak before it spots you? Do you know where rattlesnakes like to hide or where ticks look to hitch a ride? Do you know how to keep bears from getting at your food? Brush up on your knowledge of such things to minimize your chances of such things brushing up against you.   Whether you’re looking for something simple with a picnic table and fire ring you can drive to, or you want to go all-John Muir and escape into the backcountry with just a pack and a journal, there are a thousand places in our region that can be reached within a few hours and easily enjoyed over the course of a weekend, if not a lifetime. It undoubtedly takes work, but the pull of nature tugs at most of us, maybe more vigorously now in these tough economic times. So give in. Get out. Roughing it is relative, and you’re the one who defines it. For more helpful Camping tips and insight, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Style Magazine
Local Area Tidbits

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

It’s spring, so what better time to celebrate with the El Dorado Mothers of Multiples than when they host their Spring Sale on April 4, at the Marina Village Middle School. Begins at 9 a.m. For more information, visit edmoms.org...On April 15, the Folsom Public Library, along with the Folsom Zoo will present Wild Wednesday Storytime from 3:30 to 4:15 p.m., with fun animal stories and some critters for kids to meet. For more information, visit folsomlibrary.com...The Rancho Cordova Chamber of Commerce, City of Rancho Cordova and the Cordova Community Council have launched a new Web site, goranchonow.com, providing information on business, community and family in the area...Even if you missed Vista del Lago High School’s Jean & Jewels fundraiser event this past March, you can still show your support and call 916-541-2793 or email [email protected] to get involved with the next event...Join the City of Folsom on April 25, from 9 a.m. to noon, as they celebrate Arbor Day and Earth Day with Trails Day. Help build bridges, create paths and plant trees in Folsom parks and open space areas. For more information or to register, call 916-355-7285...On May 2, visit the City of Folsom’s Yard Sale from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Lembi Community Park; come out for great deals. Sale benefits families and community organizations. For more information, or if you have items to sell and would like to reserve space, call 916-355-7285...The Folsom Teen Council presents Hypnotist Night featuring hypnotist Barry Jones on April 17; show starts at 7 p.m. at Folsom High School. For more information, call 916-351-3505...Folsom Parks and Recreation, along with the Folsom Teen Council will host a Tournament Night for high school teens, events ranging from basketball to Guitar Hero, on April 24 from 7-10:30 p.m. at the Folsom Sports Complex. Price is $5 at the door with a high school ID...The Folsom Lake Crossing Bridge connecting East Natoma to Folsom-Auburn Road is now open....At the Gallery at 48 Natoma, all this month, enjoy the “Beauty in the Details” exhibit, featuring vintage car photography by Alister Oliver. For more information, visit patronsofthearts.org...And speaking of classic cars, the Cappuccino Cruisers are back with their opening cruise night on April 15, at the Folsom Red Robin Restaurant from 5-9 p.m. For more information, visit capcruz.com...Mark your calendars to join the Folsom Relay for Life on May 16, starting at 9 a.m. at the Sutter Middle School, to benefit the American Cancer Society. For more information, call 916-320-4361…Congrats to the El Dorado Hills Community Services District for their recent honor, receiving the prestigious Award of Excellence from the California Park and Recreation Society (CPRS)…Just a reminder, Brisbane Chiropractic has moved to 510 Plaza Drive, Suite 160, in Folsom. Dr. Brisbane’s office will also be featuring a different local artist’s work each month. Visit brisbanechiro.com for more information...The Folsom History Museum has reduced its adult admission to $4. The museum is open Tuesday-Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m....That’s all for now, but don’t forget to check back next month for our annual Our Kids feature issue.Send your news to: [email protected]

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Food Allergies

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

When six-year-old Zoe goes to a birthday party, the precocious El Dorado Hills first grader has to do more than just remember to bring a cool present for the guest of honor. Because of her significant peanut allergy, Zoe also has to remember to avoid eating or touching anything with peanuts, or her mouth will begin to swell and she’ll likely start vomiting.According to Kids with Food Allergies, one in every 17 American children experience adverse, sometimes life-threatening, reactions to common everyday foods like milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish and shellfish. For food sensitive kids like Zoe, the simple act of eating requires constant deliberation. But while monitoring everything a child ingests may sound overwhelming, parents say lots of preparation and communication keep a helping of stress off their daily plates.Diagnosing Food AllergiesDr. Kam Rao, an Asthma-Allergy Specialist in Placerville since 1992, estimates he sees two to five new pediatric food allergy cases a month. He cautions parents that warning signs can be subtle. “One thing to watch for is a child with typical hayfever-like symptoms not common in children,” Rao says. “Also hives, itching, rashes and even occasional vomiting should make food allergies a consideration.” Rao says the best way to know for sure if your child has an allergy is through a simple skin prick test. Proper diagnosis is important since food allergies often trigger immune system responses that affect the skin, and gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. In extreme cases, reactions cause anaphylaxis, a condition which can lead to death. Aside from allergies, still thousands more children suffer from food intolerances, an entirely different development, marked by digestive system responses such as nausea, cramping, gas or diarrhea.   ...A healthy serving of knowledge, sprinkled with some practical tips, can help families of children with food allergies enjoy life without being consumed by worry.For more on Food Allergies for children, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Folsom El Dorado Hills edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Indoor Herb Gardens

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme. These savories might call to mind that old song by Simon and Garfunkle, but have you ever considered growing these herbs yourself? This year, many of us are looking for ways to shave the dollars off our grocery bill. By growing your own herbs, you can do just that, without having to sacrifice freshness, quality or taste. An indoor herb garden is just the project for spring. Getting StartedVery few things are needed once you decide to grow an indoor herb garden – just pots, seeds or plants, a little soil, and a sunny window. Don’t feel like you have to stay with the traditional terra cotta, either. If you plan to keep your garden in the kitchen, choosing fashionable planters to complement your décor can add to the fun. Home and garden stores like Wild Plum in Grass Valley offer an assortment of containers to suit your tastes. Proper Conditions for CultivationEven though growing herbs inside is fairly simple, there are a few conditions that need to be in place to cultivate your harvest. According to Renee Towan, horticulture manager at Smith and Hawken in Roseville, “Most herbs need a lot of light – at least five to eight hours of sun, per day.” She recommends putting the pots in front of a south or southwest facing window, which allows the most light into the house. If your garden is not receiving enough light, you’ll find long stems and fading leaves on your plants, as well as leaves that fall off unexpectedly. However, even if your home doesn’t receive enough natural light, Towan says, “You can supplement it with a grow light.” Grow lights differ from standard light bulbs in that they shine the full spectrum of light required for plants to grow. They are sometimes sold already attached to pots; or, buy them separately and set them up directly above the garden.While the plants will need plenty of light, it is important to keep them away from places where they’ll experience temperature extremes, such as too close to the stove or directly beneath a heater vent. Also, be sure not to over water, which will rot the roots of the plants. It is advisable to let the soil dry out a bit between waterings. Towan also adds, “If you have the room, a six-inch pot would give the plant optimal room to grow.” In no time you’ll be ready to harvest your herbs and season your favorite dishes to tantalize the taste buds of your guests. For more about maintaining Indoor Herb Gardens, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Acupuncture

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Do you want to increase your energy, end pain, or just feel better overall? How about without prescription drugs and their possible side effects? Then maybe acupuncture is for you. Although no one really knows the story, one legend suggests the origins of acupuncture thousands of years ago. During battle, a Chinese soldier was shot with an arrow. He discovered that the stone projectile in one part of his body made the pain in another part go away. Since ancient times, instruments and techniques have changed; however, the theory remains constant. Energy continually flows throughout the body and if the energy is interrupted or blocked, illness or disease can occur.This vital energy flow is known as “Qi” (pronounced “Chee”). The Qi travels through the body in a network of channels known as meridians. Each meridian flows to a specific organ. Imagine a series of rivers and creeks – if the water currents are blocked, the stream is disturbed or stopped. The same theory applies when energy is disrupted, distressing symptoms can appear. These blockages can occur for many reasons such as trauma, poor diet, stress and side-effects from medications. For thousands of years, Asian culture has relied on this medical art form for their health needs. Not only is this practice excellent to relieve pain and other symptoms; it is used to preserve health and prevent illness. It is just in recent history that acupuncture has been accepted by the mainstream of the Western world. The acupuncturist places nearly invisible, hair-thin needles (don’t worry, it is painless) into acupuncture points along the meridian to restore the proper flow of Qi. This helps return the proper energy balance and aids the body in healing itself.Dr. Jennifer Jarrett, OMD (Oriental Medical Doctor) of Placerville has been practicing acupuncture for more than 27 years. She loves her practice and sees some patients arrive skeptical, however they usually leave pleasantly convinced. “Jarrett says, “They feel better and it trickles down into all aspects of their lives.”Roseville-based Dr. David Cherry’s office specializes in female infertility. He said in the last 15 years his practice has been able to help more than 200 women have healthy babies. “It is exceedingly rewarding to help women have babies,” Dr. Cherry says. “The joy is boundless.” Dr. Cherry, an OMD, has been practicing this ancient medical art for more than 26 years and has no plans for retiring. “I love my work so much, I never want to retire,” he says. Folsom L.Ac (Licensed Acupuncturist) Wendy Stedeford agrees, “Helping people is totally addicting.” Through her five years of practice, she has been able to help many people eliminate pain and other medical related issues that restricted their life. “I will be around treating people,” Stedeford says, “until I am 85 years old.”This ancient practice focuses on the entire body. It does not simply treat symptoms. Since daily suffering can be unnecessary, it may only be a matter of trying something new – painless needles – to find relief.

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Acupuncture

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Do you want to increase your energy, end pain, or just feel better overall? How about without prescription drugs and their possible side effects? Then maybe acupuncture is for you. Although no one really knows the story, one legend suggests the origins of acupuncture thousands of years ago. During battle, a Chinese soldier was shot with an arrow. He discovered that the stone projectile in one part of his body made the pain in another part go away. Since ancient times, instruments and techniques have changed; however, the theory remains constant. Energy continually flows throughout the body and if the energy is interrupted or blocked, illness or disease can occur.This vital energy flow is known as “Qi” (pronounced “Chee”). The Qi travels through the body in a network of channels known as meridians. Each meridian flows to a specific organ. Imagine a series of rivers and creeks – if the water currents are blocked, the stream is disturbed or stopped. The same theory applies when energy is disrupted, distressing symptoms can appear. These blockages can occur for many reasons such as trauma, poor diet, stress and side-effects from medications. For thousands of years, Asian culture has relied on this medical art form for their health needs. Not only is this practice excellent to relieve pain and other symptoms; it is used to preserve health and prevent illness. It is just in recent history that acupuncture has been accepted by the mainstream of the Western world. The acupuncturist places nearly invisible, hair-thin needles (don’t worry, it is painless) into acupuncture points along the meridian to restore the proper flow of Qi. This helps return the proper energy balance and aids the body in healing itself.Dr. Jennifer Jarrett, OMD (Oriental Medical Doctor) of Placerville has been practicing acupuncture for more than 27 years. She loves her practice and sees some patients arrive skeptical, however they usually leave pleasantly convinced. “Jarrett says, “They feel better and it trickles down into all aspects of their lives.”Roseville-based Dr. David Cherry’s office specializes in female infertility. He said in the last 15 years his practice has been able to help more than 200 women have healthy babies. “It is exceedingly rewarding to help women have babies,” Dr. Cherry says. “The joy is boundless.” Dr. Cherry, an OMD, has been practicing this ancient medical art for more than 26 years and has no plans for retiring. “I love my work so much, I never want to retire,” he says. Folsom L.Ac (Licensed Acupuncturist) Wendy Stedeford agrees, “Helping people is totally addicting.” Through her five years of practice, she has been able to help many people eliminate pain and other medical related issues that restricted their life. “I will be around treating people,” Stedeford says, “until I am 85 years old.”This ancient practice focuses on the entire body. It does not simply treat symptoms. Since daily suffering can be unnecessary, it may only be a matter of trying something new – painless needles – to find relief.

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Style Magazine
Local Area Tidbits

Mar 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Now is the perfect time to step outside and soak up the sun...April 22 is Earth Day, so help celebrate Earth by participating in Cameron Park’s Seventh Annual Community Clean-up Day on April 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., call 530-677-2231 for more information...The El Dorado Community Concert Association is holding a membership drive from May 4 to May 9 at the historic Cary House Hotel in Placerville from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, email [email protected] California Native Plant Society is having a Native Plant Sale on April 4, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Get information and advice on how to grow native plants, meet and talk with experts, and share local plant news and information. For sale location and more information, call 530-644-6335 or visit eldoradocnps.org...The Cameron Park Community Center opened Phase One on March 21, five months ahead of the projected completion date. Phase One includes a 4000-square-foot assembly hall with a stage, commercial kitchen, dance studio, administrative offices and a social center...On April 18 join S.P.E.A.R.’s Suicide Awareness Walk-A-Thon to help prevent teenage suicides. Registration starts at 8:30 a.m. at Food-4-Less in Cameron Park. Walk starts at 10 a.m. and is $25 per person or $50 for families and includes a T-shirt. For more information, call 530-676-2119...Snowline Hospice is now offering a new grief recovery program for children and their families, which provides a safe place to reflect and express feelings through a variety of cutting-edge action-focused techniques. Classes will be held every other Tuesday through June 18. For more information, call 530-621-7820...El Dorado County has a new family of wineries! Carson Road Wineries is a group of 11 family-owned wineries, all located along or near Carson Road. For more information and a list of participating wineries, visit carsonroadwineries.com...Cake Stuff, which offers classes and supplies related to all things cake, has moved! Find their new storefront at 366 Main Street in Placerville…Experience American nostalgia at its best on April 25 at the 24th Annual Grass Valley Downtown Car Show from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See vintage and antique cars and trucks along with vendor booths and live music. For more information, visit downtowngrassvalley.com...The El Dorado Main Library in Placerville is hosting a special video event on April 19...Teach your children how to survive in the wild. The American River Conservancy will be holding a free Outdoor Survival Skills class on April 11 from 9-10:30 a.m. For more information and meeting location, call 530-621-1224...That’s all for now, but don’t forget to check back next month for our annual Our Kids feature issue! Send your news to: [email protected]

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