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Paying for College

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

They got the grades. They got the acceptance letter. You’re getting the bill. Sound familiar? If you’re the parent of a high school student, and college tuition bills are causing anxiety, don’t fret. There are many avenues available for financial aid, regardless of your yearly income, plus savings plans for students and parents.First Things First: The FAFSA“One of the biggest myths about a college education is that students can’t afford one,” says Brett Tujague, Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) Coordinator at Roseville’s Woodcreek High School. He advises all his college-bound students to apply for financial aid, regardless of their family income.Financial aid is broken down into two main categories: grants/scholarships (money you don’t have to pay back), and loans (money you do have to pay back). The gateway to all financial aid is through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students will not receive any aid, not even student loans, without filling out the FAFSA. Both parents and students need to sign up for a PIN to electronically sign the FAFSA, which is quick and easy to do at pin.ed.gov. Families should only fill out the FAFSA at fafsa.ed.gov, where the application is free. Many scam sites charge a fee to fill out the application, so don’t be fooled. The FAFSA filing period is between January 1 and March 2 each year. Once a student’s FAFSA is processed, the family will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) that states the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number on it. This number is the amount of money a family is expected to contribute to their student’s education. A family’s EFC does not change based on the school’s price tag. In some situations, a private college or university may end up being less expensive than a public one....Savings PlansThere are numerous investment vehicles to choose from when financially preparing for college. Edward Jones, with advisors in Folsom and El Dorado Hills; as well Amerprise Financial of Folsom, both help families set up savings plans. A 529 plan, which offers tax incentives and currently is not included in the child’s assets for financial aid, affords you flexibility while saving money for tuition and even related expenses. With a little forethought and smart money management, a first-rate education can be affordable.For more information on College Funding tips and ideas, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Roseville, granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Time of the Month

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Women have more options, and there are fewer hysterectomies these days as a result of the many alternatives available to them,” according to Dr. Denise L. Sweeney, M.D., F.A.C.O.G, who practices at Associates in Women’s Health Care in Roseville. “Women are fortunate [to have] these new treatments, that free them up, with very little down time,” says Dr. Sweeney. An estimated 20 million American women have had a hysterectomy. One-third of American women experience some type of pelvic health disorder by the time they are 60, and many have a hysterectomy, which is removing their uterus to relieve troubling symptoms. Women with painful periods, excessive bleeding, fibroids, endometriosis or other pelvic health problems will find comfort in learning that there are new alternatives to consider. Treating Uterine Fibroids Uterine fibroids are tumors that are usually benign and are found on the smooth muscles of the uterus and can cause pelvic pain, infertility and heavy menstrual bleeding. Their cause is complex, but uterine fibroids are a major reason why women have hysterectomies.  If fibroids are causing no symptoms, it’s common to monitor the status with your doctor and wait to have surgery unless problems develop. There are less invasive options for treating fibroids: A Myomectomy is the surgical removal of the fibroids alone. A Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE), also known as Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE), is a fairly simple, noninvasive procedure in which small particles are injected into the uterine arteries feeding the fibroids, cutting off their blood supply. It’s been used for years to help stop hemorrhage after childbirth or surgery, however, there is a risk of early menopause if those particles travel to the ovarian blood supply. With this treatment, symptoms are reported to improve in 85 percent of patients. A hysteroscopy is a minor surgical procedure with minimal recuperation time. It is the insertion of a thin telescope like instrument, called a hysteroscope, and can be used if the fibroid is primarily within the cavity of the uterus. Medical management is a way to initially treat painful symptoms with non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory agents. If that is not effective, another option is a class of drugs that blocks the ovaries’ production of estrogen and other hormones.   Treating Menorrhagia Severe vaginal bleeding is known as menorrhagia. The bleeding may come from uterine fibroids, but in many cases the cause remains unknown. Doctors have a medical threshold for menorrhagia, but they also define it by how much it affects your daily life by causing pain, mood swings, and disruptions in your work and sexual activity. The treatment options are medical management, using either oral contraceptives or an intrauterine device (IUD) releasing a hormone called levonorgestrel. Endometrial ablation is an option if you don’t plan to have more children. “This is an excellent option, can be done in the office and 80 percent of women will never have another period,” Dr. Sweeney adds. It is possible that whatever your condition is, a hysterectomy may be the most effective treatment. But, with the many new alternatives available, it is important to discuss all of your options with your doctor. Abnormal bleeding can be the first sign of uterine cancer and therefore should not be ignored. The positive news is that most hysterectomies can now be done with minimally invasive techniques and only an overnight hospitalization, if the alternatives are not an option.

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Acres of Hope

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Individuals without the benefit of residential shelter or related support often find themselves homeless. If homelessness is all but a   societal-given today, it is also what it has always been: largely preventable. Look no further than Acres of Hope. Headquartered in Applegate, this local nonprofit is working to address high recidivism rates among the area’s homeless population.“We assist homeless mothers with children who have a sincere desire to address and overcome obstacles in their lives,” says Regina Sarmento, executive director and developer of the program. “Many homeless individuals cycle from one program to another with no permanent solution. We exist to break that cycle for women who are ready for the hard work that it takes.” The mission is ambitious, but so is Acres of Hope. Since opening its doors nearly three years ago, the nonprofit has served more than 30 women and 62 children. Eighty-six percent of its former residents are living healthy lives and are still connected to Acres of Hope in various capacities. “Homelessness is only one aspect of a long line of issues [we address],” Sarmento says. “Our focus is on quality of life. Our goal is to provide a safe environment where trust can be established. We challenge the belief systems that drive behaviors.” Through its work, the Acres of Hope team has identified three common denominators of why people continue in destructive cycles – a lack of healthy support systems, an unwillingness to seek help because it hurts, and not applying information previously learned. The organization responds to these core issues by teaching residents how to establish healthy relationships through mentorship and “real world” friendship; evaluating residents in 25 measurable areas, and helping to establish goals in each; monitoring their success; providing practical classes, and awarding completion certificates when new behaviors are adopted.While statistics may prove the program’s overall effectiveness – 7,983 beds were filled last year; 23,949 meals were provided; 86 percent of former residents are now living outside the program clean and sober – there is far more compelling proof. Acres of Hope has also helped Child Protective Services close cases, and played a key role in reuniting five families.So what’s next for this boundary-breaking nonprofit? The operation of a new secondhand boutique in Roseville called ReNew, the proceeds of which will benefit Acres of Hope, a new slate of relevant classes for 2009, and the organization’s annual fundraiser – Taste for Hope. The event, which will be held on March 14, 2009, at the Sunset Center in Rocklin, will include delicious fare from local restaurants, entertainment and a silent auction. Tickets and sponsorship opportunities are available.If you are still wondering if it takes a village to make a difference, Sarmento says, “We have so many loyal supporters to honor for sustaining us. We want to thank them for the difference they make in their community.”To explore volunteer opportunities with Acres of Hope, visit acresofhopeonline.org, or call 530-878-8030.

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Eco-Friendly Territory

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

AT YOUR DISPOSALReuse, recycle, rethink and waste not! That’s the message of the Diamond Springs-based El Dorado Disposal – a Waste Connections Company that offers integrated solid waste services to residents in Cameron Park, El Dorado Hills, Placerville and unincorporated El Dorado County. This service company, which collects, transfers, disposes and recycles environmentally unsafe toxins from your home’s unruly clutter, also helps rid the world of waste that has compounded the very immediate problem of climate change. El Dorado Disposal operates two separate recycling programs: the first is reserved for green waste; materials accepted for collection are grass clippings, brush, pine needles and cones; leaves, pruning and flowers, wood and branches. Residential materials accepted for the household recycling program include newspapers and various other paper materials; corrugated cardboard, paperboard and paper egg cartons; steel, tin and bi-metal cans; aluminum cans and clean foils, bottles and household cleaning products. (For a complete list of unacceptable items, refer to the Web site.) El Dorado Disposal also operates a large Material Recovery Facility, which is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week. Beyond collecting residential waste from actual homes, El Dorado Disposal also operates three recycling centers in Placerville, El Dorado Hills and Cameron Park. E-waste is accepted at all three locations, all of which offer a can and bottle buy back service, and a drop-off box for household batteries. Removing solid waste and hazardous materials significantly impacts the health of the planet, and also upholds and protects public health standards. That is why El Dorado Disposal works with the county’s Solid Waste and Hazardous Materials Department, which is dedicated to safe waste removal accomplished through “enforcement activities, incident response, public education, litter collection and oversight,” according to the organization. El Dorado Disposal also holds various Spring Cleanup events each year. For more detailed information, contact El Dorado Disposal Customer Service at 530-626-4141 or 916-985-1162, or visit eldoradodisposal.com.For more eco-friendly tips and ideas, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Folsom, El Dorado Hills edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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La Provence

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

When asked if he had ever cooked for a celebrity, Chef Shane McMahon said everybody who comes into La Provence is a celebrity. “A big TV star or politician should get the same treatment as someone coming in for an anniversary, or just out on Friday night for fun. The food shouldn’t be any different.”McMahon is the youngest of seven children. At 16 years-old he began his professional culinary career. He enjoys the teamwork and camaraderie in the kitchen, and the fast pace of it all. “There [is] always something to do,” he says. McMahon got much inspiration early on from his colleagues, whom took great pride in their jobs and were very good at them too. McMahon cooked for seven years, went into the Marine Corps and then to culinary school. He worked on the American Orient Express, a private luxury train, for 12 months. He likens it to a cruise ship on rails.La Provence and Chef McMahon offer wine dinners every month (except December); they invite a winemaker and create a menu around their wines. Everything is from scratch – all stocks, soups and butchery are constructed from the ground up. McMahon’s menu at La Provence follows closely their concept of being as Provencal French as possible, with a fresh California influence.For more about Shane McMahon, including his recipe for Roasted Beet Salad with Candied Walnuts and Champagne Vinaigrette, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style-Roseville Granite Bay Rocklin edition. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

Read More »
Time of the Month

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Women have more options, and there are fewer hysterectomies these days as a result of the many alternatives available to them,” according to Dr. Denise L. Sweeney, M.D., F.A.C.O.G, who practices at Associates in Women’s Health Care in Roseville. “Women are fortunate [to have] these new treatments, that free them up, with very little down time,” says Dr. Sweeney. An estimated 20 million American women have had a hysterectomy. One-third of American women experience some type of pelvic health disorder by the time they are 60, and many have a hysterectomy, which is removing their uterus to relieve troubling symptoms. Women with painful periods, excessive bleeding, fibroids, endometriosis or other pelvic health problems will find comfort in learning that there are new alternatives to consider. Treating Uterine Fibroids Uterine fibroids are tumors that are usually benign and are found on the smooth muscles of the uterus and can cause pelvic pain, infertility and heavy menstrual bleeding. Their cause is complex, but uterine fibroids are a major reason why women have hysterectomies.  If fibroids are causing no symptoms, it’s common to monitor the status with your doctor and wait to have surgery unless problems develop. There are less invasive options for treating fibroids: A Myomectomy is the surgical removal of the fibroids alone. A Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE), also known as Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE), is a fairly simple, noninvasive procedure in which small particles are injected into the uterine arteries feeding the fibroids, cutting off their blood supply. It’s been used for years to help stop hemorrhage after childbirth or surgery, however, there is a risk of early menopause if those particles travel to the ovarian blood supply. With this treatment, symptoms are reported to improve in 85 percent of patients. A hysteroscopy is a minor surgical procedure with minimal recuperation time. It is the insertion of a thin telescope like instrument, called a hysteroscope, and can be used if the fibroid is primarily within the cavity of the uterus. Medical management is a way to initially treat painful symptoms with non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory agents. If that is not effective, another option is a class of drugs that blocks the ovaries’ production of estrogen and other hormones.   Treating Menorrhagia Severe vaginal bleeding is known as menorrhagia. The bleeding may come from uterine fibroids, but in many cases the cause remains unknown. Doctors have a medical threshold for menorrhagia, but they also define it by how much it affects your daily life by causing pain, mood swings, and disruptions in your work and sexual activity. The treatment options are medical management, using either oral contraceptives or an intrauterine device (IUD) releasing a hormone called levonorgestrel. Endometrial ablation is an option if you don’t plan to have more children. “This is an excellent option, can be done in the office and 80 percent of women will never have another period,” Dr. Sweeney adds. It is possible that whatever your condition is, a hysterectomy may be the most effective treatment. But, with the many new alternatives available, it is important to discuss all of your options with your doctor. Abnormal bleeding can be the first sign of uterine cancer and therefore should not be ignored. The positive news is that most hysterectomies can now be done with minimally invasive techniques and only an overnight hospitalization, if the alternatives are not an option.

Read More »