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Local Area Tidbits

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

First off, if you haven’t heard already…Congratulations to City of Roseville and Phoenix Decorating Co. for taking the Governor’s Trophy for best depiction of life in California, “Entertaining Dreams For A Century,” at January’s 120th Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, CA…Do you like green eggs and ham? If so, then you’re in luck this month as Whoville descends upon Roseville. With the induction of Dr. Seuss, a.k.a Theodor Geisel, into the 2009 California Hall of Fame, Roseville is celebrating the genius of Dr. Seuss with events all month long...The Roseville Public Library will be accepting Dr. Seuss inspired submissions for their 21st Annual Poetry Contest for kids ages 1-12. Entries will be accepted the entire month of February. For more information, call 916-774-5455 or visit roseville.ca.us/library...Indulge your inner shopper every Third Tuesday of the month at A Dash of Panache’s Local Vendor Faire. For more information, call 916-788-4386...Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center is offering a Carcinoid Cancer Support Group on February 7 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 916-784-5828…Join the Roseville Utility Exploration Center for their Green Gardening Workshop on Vermicomposting-Worms in the Kitchen. Workshop will be held on February 21, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more information, visit roseville.ca.us/explore/programs.asp or call 916-746-1550...The Roseville Sports Center is offering a cooking class for children ages 8-12 on February 7 from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. For more information or to register, call 916-774-5990...Congratulations to Darrel Sarmento and his wife for opening up Renew Boutique in old Roseville, which will help provide Acres of Hope mothers with professional clothing to wear on job interview and will feature upscale consignment-quality women’s and children’s clothing as well as small household items and decor. For more information visit, acresofhopeonline.org…Congratulations to Roderick Williams on becoming the new executive chef at the New Horseshoe Bar Grille in Loomis. Check out the redesigned menu and daily specials...Valentine’s Day is February 14 and if your kids are looking for unique cards to give to their class, head over to the Roseville Utility Exploration Center for a Valentine’s Day Green Gift and Card Making workshop on February 7, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Kids, ages 7-12, can create fun, beautiful gifts and cards for family and friends using recycled materials. For more information, call 916-746-1550...Dress in your finest and join the Maria Montessori Charter Academy for their Black & White Charity Event, “Dancing Through The Decades” on February 27, at the Sunset Center in Rocklin. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit mmcharter.org/charity_event.htm...And for the caffeine-inclined, be sure to visit the new Bloom Coffee & Tea (located on the corner of Eureka and Rocky Ridge in Roseville), built from the ground up by the18 & 20 years-old Elia brothers. Congrats! Be sure to check back next month for our annual Food and Drink feature issue!Send your news and Info to: [email protected]

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Eco-Friendly Territory

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Not only does unnecessary waste clutter your otherwise happy home, unruly junk (let’s just call it what it is) is environmentally toxic, and in many cases, dangerously so. That is why the City of Folsom Hazardous Materials Division provides pick-up protection of difficult-to-handle materials – a residential door-to-door collection service for all household hazardous waste, which in this case includes everything from batteries, pesticides, electronics, and flammables to aerosol cans, antifreeze, fats, oils and grease (for a complete list, visit the City of Folsom’s Web site at folsom.ca.us). Beyond resident households, the City has also extended the program to collect California Universal Wastes (electronics and fluorescents) from local businesses and non-profit organizations. “This type of direct service has resulted in high citizen participation, high hazardous waste diversion from landfills, and climate change benefits [by] capturing refrigerants, GWP chemicals, and reducing individual vehicle trips to permanent collection facilities,” according to the program’s summary report, which also cites that 52 percent of households have used the service to date. And why not, when it is literally at their disposal? For helping local residents properly dispose of hazardous Global Warming materials, and for reducing high-polluting vehicle trips to do so, this forward-thinking program won the 2005 California Integrated Waste Management Board and the 2007 North American Hazardous Materials Management Association Program Excellence Awards. Pick-up appointments – available on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays – can be scheduled online or by calling 916-355-8397.folsomhazmat.comFor more eco-friendly tips and ideas, be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Folsom, El Dorado Hills edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Mike Sproull

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

It’s hard to believe that Mike Sproull, founder and Executive Director of the Food Bank of El Dorado County, would say that, “for many years, I served myself and myself only.” He decided to change that though, and turned his life around in 1996, when he started working to help others. Sproull says, “The Food Bank is a product of my [personal] change.” Sproull goes on to say, “years ago, I used to say to poor people, ‘get a job.’ [But] I've learned that a lot of people can't get jobs because of their situation, such as senior citizens, individuals with mental health issues, and single mothers caring for their children.” The Food Bank is El Dorado County's largest collaborative charity providing food assistance to over 50 charities in communities from El Dorado Hills to South Lake Tahoe. In 2008, the Bank provided over $3.5 million worth of food to the community on a budget one-seventh of that number.  Currently, the Food Bank of El Dorado County's Food Assistance Network – made up of emergency food closets, soup kitchens, maternity homes, women's centers, drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers, low-income senior programs, low-income children's programs and more – provide food assistance to over 10,000 individuals every month.The most important thing that Sproull wants community members to know about the Food Bank of El Dorado County is, “This charity is not a government-funded organization, just a grassroots representation of caring community members including businesses, individuals and service clubs,” relays Sproull. For more information on the Food Bank of El Dorado County, please call 530-621-9950 or 916-939-6774, or visit foodbankedc.org.For more on Mike Sproull be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Young at Art

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

As a “creative” kid, I knew firsthand how stressful and out of place that label could be. I can’t tell you how many beautiful spring Saturdays my father would usher me out to the local park so I could chew my mitt in the outfield and watch baseballs fly over my head. I don’t blame my dad for giving it the old college try – he was only trying to share with me the activities he enjoyed as a child. The problem was...I didn’t share his enthusiasm for sports. I wasn’t particularly lazy or protesting the grass-stained polyester uniforms per se, but I had this feeling my time could be spent in a more productive, enlightening manner. Finally, they did see my artistic “potential” through my love of drawing and quickly invested in a rather handsome art kit and drafting table. The mitt and polyester are now a faded memory.Unfortunately, many artistically inclined children find few resources readily available to them at school or at afternoon programs, with athletics taking front and center in funding and participation. Parents tuned in to their child’s creative needs may need to get “creative” themselves, seeking out the right resources and activities. Here are a few ideas to get your little Michelangelo or Martha Graham on the right track....Get Involved If your child’s school doesn’t offer the programs he or she needs to get their creative juices flowing, seek them out elsewhere at local centers and organizations that offer workshops and activities geared around the arts. Finding dance or drawing classes outside their normal social sphere allows kids to branch out and find a community of other budding artists who share their passion. Kids get some of their best knowledge from other peers, and an enthusiastic talented group of youngsters is a good place to start.For more local kids' Art Programs be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Jim Fitzpatrick

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Sometime in the late 15th century a bunch of guys got together and played the first round of golf. They swung at pebbles with tree branches while moving around a natural course of rabbit runs and sand dunes on the east coast of Scotland. Today the game is somewhat more refined and flourishes with millions of devoted players throughout the world. Maybe the centuries-old attraction is as journalist PJ O’Rourke once offered, “Golf combines two favorite American pastimes: taking long walks and hitting things with a stick.”Jim Fitzpatrick’s lifelong passion for the game of golf drives nearly his every endeavor. This self-described golf artist and historian has painted golf scenes and players for more than 25 years. After working as a golf course designer and marketing executive, he decided to make a career out of what he loves to do, create golf art. “I’m an okay golfer,” Fitspatrick says. “The game cannot be perfected, but you can try in extraordinarily beautiful surroundings.”During his career, Fitzpatrick played and painted some of the most beautiful courses in the world. “My favorite,” he says, “is the 16th hole at Cypress Point.” However, it must be hard to choose, since he has enjoyed playing such courses as St. Andrews in Scotland, Augusta, and here in Granite Bay. One of his specialties, and very popular among his admiring collectors, is the art reproduction technique of Enhanced Giclee. Fitzpatrick takes a fine copy of one of his paintings and then personally retouches it by painting people into the scene. With this method, he can paint a customized piece of art that recreates a moment in history or a special round of golf for a player. “My clients think my art,” he admits, “is a wonderful souvenir of an unforgettable moment in their golfing life.”At the request of his extensive clientele, he expanded his art to sculpture and fine pencil drawings. His work, in many mediums, is featured in some of the most prestigious golf clubs and in the offices and homes of some of the most famous players of all time. One of his most ardent fans is golf legend Billy Casper. The two have been friends for decades. Fitzpatrick works with Casper to develop original art that is used as prizes for the annual Billy Casper Golf Classic. “Jim is one of the great talents in golf art,” Casper explains. “His work will stand the test of time.” Local businessman John Curtan has been collecting Jim’s art for more than 10 years. “I think Jim,” Curtan says, “is the best golf artist on the planet.” Curtan owns 20 pieces of art and is planning on buying more. He enjoys spending time at Fitzpatrick’s gallery and stops by for a visit at least once a week. “Jim is just a wonderful person,” Curtan says. “I love to hang out and listen to his golf stories.”To experience Fitzpatrick's work, visit his Granite Bay gallery or his Web site at jfitzpatrickart.com.

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Dancing Daddy

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Given the state of the economy, I have decided that I need a back-up career. My regular job seems secure enough, and for that I am truly thankful. But these days you never know, so it’s good to have a back-up plan. Mine is: A Dancing Sign Guy.  I’m not saying I’m a great dancer. To the contrary, I dance like Frankenstein stomping on ants with his shoes on fire.  But I don’t think you need to be a good dancer...just have a little enthusiasm. I mean, how often have you seen a “dancing” sign person who could better be described as a “standing” sign person, or a “sitting” sign person, or a “not-sure-where-they’re-at” sign person? C’mon guys...you’re not making me want to visit your new apartment complex very badly. Move around a little. Shake that thang. Uh, the sign, I mean. Mostly...but shaking other thangs probably wouldn’t hurt, unless doing so causes a slipped disc. Next, if you can, kick it up a notch. Add a little something extra, something that draws eyes to your presentation like wasps to a salmon barbeque. For example, there’s a young lady who dances sign (I’m not sure if that’s how they put it, but if truck drivers can say they “drive truck” I think it should be okay) on the corner of Garfield and Greenback. She can spin the sign on her finger like a basketball while simultaneously displaying footwork that would make her a finalist on Dancing with the Stars. Or, she’ll bend at the waist and whirl like a dervish, with the sign on her back rotating in the opposite direction. The Kings ought to hire her for a half-time show.Then there was a guy who used to sign wrangle for a furniture store on Riverside. He was unbelievably, another great dancer, who moved like he had certain sensitive parts of his body hot-wired to a car battery. Last I heard, a new gated community in the Bay Area hired him. Yeah baby...the Big Time.   But, again, dancing per se isn’t wholly necessary. For a while there was a guy on the corner of Junction and Foothill, who would simply head bang...I mean hard-core, neck-snappin’, scalp-flippin’, Angus Young-apin’ head banging. I don’t know what music he had in his headphones but I’ll bet it came with a parental advisory sticker. He would lurch and stomp menacingly towards traffic – think Gene Simmons straining at his dungeon chains – while shaking his sign as though it read “ROCK ON PUNY MORTALS” instead of “Mr. Pickles.” He made the idea of a sandwich seem like a power chord for your belly.Anyway, that’s the point. Like any job, you need a little zeal, and you need to know how to use it. So no, I don’t dance well. But give me a sign and step back, because I’ve given this a lot of thought and if I ever get this gig, I would take fundamental enthusiasm and the only dance steps I know – which are stolen from Bruce Springsteen in his “Dancing in the Dark” video – and combine them with the one irresistible force I can bring to the table (or busy street corner)...my man-kini. A joke gift (I hope it was a joke) from my wife for my 40th birthday – it’s never been out of its box. Really. No, REALLY. But it’s there, on a closet shelf like a skimpy, tiger-striped fire extinguisher, in case of emergency. I can hear the drivers now: “Oh my, what is that creepy sign guy wearing? (Enter gag reflex.) Hey, six months of free cellular service from Joe’s Mobile Phone Hut?!” I wouldn’t be a “Dancing Sign Guy.” I’d be a “Dancing Sign Daddy.” You know, on second thought, let’s just hope that I keep the job I have, and this whole recession thing is over really, really soon.Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

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Young at Art

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

As a “creative” kid, I knew firsthand how stressful and out of place that label could be. I can’t tell you how many beautiful spring Saturdays my father would usher me out to the local park so I could chew my mitt in the outfield and watch baseballs fly over my head. I don’t blame my dad for giving it the old college try – he was only trying to share with me the activities he enjoyed as a child. The problem was...I didn’t share his enthusiasm for sports. I wasn’t particularly lazy or protesting the grass-stained polyester uniforms per se, but I had this feeling my time could be spent in a more productive, enlightening manner. Finally, they did see my artistic “potential” through my love of drawing and quickly invested in a rather handsome art kit and drafting table. The mitt and polyester are now a faded memory.Unfortunately, many artistically inclined children find few resources readily available to them at school or at afternoon programs, with athletics taking front and center in funding and participation. Parents tuned in to their child’s creative needs may need to get “creative” themselves, seeking out the right resources and activities. Here are a few ideas to get your little Michelangelo or Martha Graham on the right track.Observe What kind of toys are they drawn to? What do they like to do in their spare time? Paying close attention to their leisure time may reveal clues about their artistic interests. Those doodles on the Etch-a-Sketch, carefully placed blocks, or extraordinary sculptures in Play-Doh may hint at a future masterpiece. Who knows, all that banging on the highchair could be the beginnings of the next Ringo Starr....For more local kids' Art Programs be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Folsom, El Dorado Hills edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Clarksburg

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Down Interstate 5, and across the “green bridge” to Highway 160, you’ll find Clarksburg, a tiny, tranquil town with a population of 1,400. The town fronts the languid, murky Sacramento River in true delta-town style. Clarksburg was settled in the mid-1800s as an agricultural community, and today, is known for its grape production. Golden-green grape vines and rows of spectacular vineyards dot the highway to the west, and the docile river, including boats and waterfowl, borders the west.A wine-lover’s dream, Bogle Vineyards might be the most well known winery in the area. Owned by the Bogle family since the 1800s, the 1,000-acre farm originally produced tomatoes and corn. The first grapes were planted in 1968, and picturesque chardonnay grapes are abundant on the property, beckoning visitors to pack a picnic basket and set a spell at outdoor tables with maximum views. The tasting room is a perfect place to sample the especially tasty 2006 Ghosts du Roam, a red and fruity blend of Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedre. Of course, any wine in the tasting room is sure to please. Don’t miss the 11th Annual Petite Sirah Port Weekend,?February 14-15, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For multiple grape-filled offerings, stop at the historic Old Sugar Mill. The mill, which processed sugar beets in the 30s, is home to wine-tasting rooms, representing five unique wineries, including Carvalho Family Wines,?Heringer Estates,?Todd Taylor Wines, Solomon Wine Company, and?Revolution Wines. Step inside the cavernous red-brick building and you will quickly find that each tasting room has a unique, charming ambiance. Heringer Estates, lined with skyscraper-like rows of barrels filled to the brim with both robust and delicate wines, is worth a visit. When you’ve worked up an appetite, Husick’s Country Store is the perfect stop. The building, here since the 1800s, now houses the purveyor of fine wines, gifts, and most recently, homemade, mouth-watering cuisine. The Pump House Sandwich – slow roasted turkey and provolone on handcrafted bread with homemade cranberry and orange relish – is popular, as are the many additional lunchtime offerings. Husick’s also makes specialty coffees and other beverages, and hosts wine tastings on third Saturdays, from 1 to 5 p.m.Schumacher Ceramics and Gallery is a must-see. Schumacher, who creates his one-of-a-kind ceramic pieces in a studio beneath his gallery, works and shows his art in a historical building that originally housed Husick’s Hardware. He specializes in handmade sinks and custom tiles, and showcases works of 20 or so potters and artists throughout the area. Schumacher’s work can be seen throughout Sacramento. He created the base for the famed guitar outside Sacramento’s Hard Rock Café, a fountain at the State Capitol’s Rose Garden and other public works. Items like dishware, bowls, sculpture and more line the gallery’s shelves. So, if you're in the mood for a little wine sipping, a little shopping and some great sight-seeing, Clarksburg is a great destination off the beaten path.For more info on Clarksburg be sure to pick up this month's copy of Style – Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin, edition. Check out the Distribution tab on this Web site for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email  [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Dancing Daddy

Jan 31, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Given the state of the economy, I have decided that I need a back-up career. My regular job seems secure enough, and for that I am truly thankful. But these days you never know, so it’s good to have a back-up plan. Mine is: A Dancing Sign Guy.  I’m not saying I’m a great dancer. To the contrary, I dance like Frankenstein stomping on ants with his shoes on fire.  But I don’t think you need to be a good dancer...just have a little enthusiasm. I mean, how often have you seen a “dancing” sign person who could better be described as a “standing” sign person, or a “sitting” sign person, or a “not-sure-where-they’re-at” sign person? C’mon guys...you’re not making me want to visit your new apartment complex very badly. Move around a little. Shake that thang. Uh, the sign, I mean. Mostly...but shaking other thangs probably wouldn’t hurt, unless doing so causes a slipped disc. Next, if you can, kick it up a notch. Add a little something extra, something that draws eyes to your presentation like wasps to a salmon barbeque. For example, there’s a young lady who dances sign (I’m not sure if that’s how they put it, but if truck drivers can say they “drive truck” I think it should be okay) on the corner of Garfield and Greenback. She can spin the sign on her finger like a basketball while simultaneously displaying footwork that would make her a finalist on Dancing with the Stars. Or, she’ll bend at the waist and whirl like a dervish, with the sign on her back rotating in the opposite direction. The Kings ought to hire her for a half-time show.Then there was a guy who used to sign wrangle for a furniture store on Riverside. He was unbelievably, another great dancer, who moved like he had certain sensitive parts of his body hot-wired to a car battery. Last I heard, a new gated community in the Bay Area hired him. Yeah baby...the Big Time.   But, again, dancing per se isn’t wholly necessary. For a while there was a guy on the corner of Junction and Foothill, who would simply head bang...I mean hard-core, neck-snappin’, scalp-flippin’, Angus Young-apin’ head banging. I don’t know what music he had in his headphones but I’ll bet it came with a parental advisory sticker. He would lurch and stomp menacingly towards traffic – think Gene Simmons straining at his dungeon chains – while shaking his sign as though it read “ROCK ON PUNY MORTALS” instead of “Mr. Pickles.” He made the idea of a sandwich seem like a power chord for your belly.Anyway, that’s the point. Like any job, you need a little zeal, and you need to know how to use it. So no, I don’t dance well. But give me a sign and step back, because I’ve given this a lot of thought and if I ever get this gig, I would take fundamental enthusiasm and the only dance steps I know – which are stolen from Bruce Springsteen in his “Dancing in the Dark” video – and combine them with the one irresistible force I can bring to the table (or busy street corner)...my man-kini. A joke gift (I hope it was a joke) from my wife for my 40th birthday – it’s never been out of its box. Really. No, REALLY. But it’s there, on a closet shelf like a skimpy, tiger-striped fire extinguisher, in case of emergency. I can hear the drivers now: “Oh my, what is that creepy sign guy wearing? (Enter gag reflex.) Hey, six months of free cellular service from Joe’s Mobile Phone Hut?!” I wouldn’t be a “Dancing Sign Guy.” I’d be a “Dancing Sign Daddy.” You know, on second thought, let’s just hope that I keep the job I have, and this whole recession thing is over really, really soon.Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

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