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The Vine

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

2005 Oakstone Reserve Barbera• The 2005 Oakstone Reserve Barbera is quite a find. Since reader feedback asked me to review wines under $15 (so many have been $30+ lately), this Barbera from Oakstone fits the bill nicely! All good wines start in the vineyard; the fruit for this wine comes from the J&J Vineyard, owned by Judy and Joel Sklar – a vineyard on Perry Creek road known for its outstanding fruit. Winemaker John Smith turns that fruit into a very soft and lush Barbera that drinks very well. Barbera can be overly acidic, but John crafts this wine to have a nice round fruitiness and balanced acid, making it a must-have with red sauce pasta! This local wine certainly stands on its own merit, winning a Silver medal at the Orange County Fair, so the price at $14 is just icing on the cake. Speaking of cake – I love to drink Barbera with a slice of chocolate cake, something everyone should try at least once! This Barbera can be found at the winery tasting room in Fair Play or at most local supermarkets.— Russell ReyesRussell is a freelance writer who hosts monthly Dolce Vino Wine University in Cameron Park.His blog is foothillwinereview.com.For more wine reviews from Local Connoisseurs, be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Batter Chatter

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Hey, how ya doin. I’m a backstop. Yep, that big metal thing behind home plate at a ballpark near you. I know...I’m not supposed to be able to talk. Well, your kids aren’t supposed to climb on me, so we’re even. Tom was a little too busy (i.e. he couldn’t think of anything to write) so the editors asked me to step in and share a few of my thoughts on a national treasure that’s about to come back around again, youth baseball.I’ve been a backstop for a long time. The parks department put me up in ‘83. I’m 20 x 16 panelized feet of galvanized steel. I’ve seen a lot of kids playin’ ball and there’s nothing I love more. I guess you could say it’s my reason for being. Over the years I’ve noticed that a few certain elements seem to be the keys to success for everything from boy’s hardball to girl’s softball – both of which I love, by the way. Hey, backstops don’t play favorites (and neither do the umps, but no one ever believes me on that one).One: The parents gotta not only care, but care for the right reasons. If their six-year-old doesn’t poke a homer off the tee, they still oughta get a trip to the ice cream shop after the game. I’m happy to report, most parents get that. But I think the same should go for a 12-year-old. Yeah, they may look like a big-leaguer when they step up to the plate or onto the pitcher’s mound with their game face on, but in the dugout they’re still having burp contests and arguing over who would win in a fight, Batman or Spiderman. Come to think of it, so are a lot of the players in adult recreational softball leagues. Two: Hopefully your kid is out there because they love the game, because there’s no doubt they’re out there because they love YOU. They want you to be proud of ‘em – even the little tyke doing the pee-pee dance in right field. Never stop letting them know how great you think it is that they lace up their cleats – even if they’re tying them on their own now. Three: They’re learning a game – how to hit, throw, run it out to first, all that stuff. But they’re also learning life lessons like fair play, good sportsmanship and making a commitment to others. If you’re tryin’ to stack a team in the pre-season draft, or yellin’ at a 15-year-old ump for missing a call at second, or always missing practices or getting your kid there late, think about the message that sends. It sure ain’t one they’re gonna run on the scoreboard between innings at Pac Bell Park. Four: Winning is great. It’s awesome. It makes me quiver right down to my anchor blocks. But win with class – clamp down on any smack talk or in-your-face celebrations (and that includes some of you parents in the stands). And while you’re at it, teach them how to lose with grace. Sure, it’s fine to kick a little dirt, but losing a little league game shouldn’t be anything that ruins a weekend, or even the ride home. Five: Teach ‘em to support their teammates. Parents and coaches are one thing. But there’s nothing better to the ears (or heart) of a kid who just struck out for the fifth time in a row than to get some encouragement and a pat on the back from a teammate. When they finally do uncork one, it’ll be tough to tell who’s got the bigger smile.Six: Countin’ on your kid to be the next Jenny Finch or Dustin Pedroia? Great, but don’t push ‘em too hard or else you run a real risk of burning them out or wearing them out before they even reach high school. Let your kid’s drive lead you...not the other way around. That’s not to say don’t push a little, but never let that push become a shove.Seven: The most important – enjoy these moments. Once they’re gone, that’s it. You wanna come away with some great memories, right? Well, so does your child. Support, teach, and support some more. It’s pretty simple. Oh, and don’t forget the ice cream. •Catch Tom on the Pat and Tom Morning Show on New Country 105.1.

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Pismo Beach

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Located half way between San Francisco and Los Angeles, Pismo Beach or South San Luis Obispo county, makes a great “get-away to the beach” destination. Not only will you find a quaint city by the sea with gorgeous views in all directions, but you can simply hop in the car and in 20 minutes or less you will find some of the best vineyards and wineries in California (Paso Robles is California’s third largest and fastest growing wine region) along with a great downtown shopping experience in San Luis Obispo just down the freeway.10 REASONS TO VISITIf lying by the beach, or sipping wine is not your thing, don’t fret, that’s the beauty of visiting Pismo – where there’s a plethora of activity options.1. March through May – Hearst Castle Evening Tours – This legendary California manor sits at 1,600 feet above sea level, and the evening tour allows visitors to experience the Castle at night just as a visitor to the Castle in the ’30s might have. For more information, visit hearstcastle.org2. March 6-March 15 –15th Annual San Luis Obispo International Film Festival – The Film Festival will bring filmmakers, film buffs, and celebrities for cinematic events held throughout the county. For more information, call 805-235-5404 or visit slofilmfest.org.3. March 20-22 – 27th Annual Zinfandel Festival – At the Donati Family Vineyard in Templeton, enjoy guided winery tours at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Learn the grape’s journey from vine to bottle, and view the crush pad, cellar, barrel room and hospitality center! Catch great spring deals on wine - do you have your white wine yet? For more information, call 805-238-0676 or e-mail [email protected] April through November – Shell Beach Farmers Market – Enjoy perusing the market for fresh produce, flowers, jams, dried fruits and artisan vinegars, all grown by local farmers. You can also expect to see exotic foods, jewelry, massage therapy, tea and live entertainment. For more information, e-mail [email protected] April 26 – Taste of Pismo – Restaurants of Pismo Beach and local wineries will showcase multiple culinary and vineyard delights at this event. Tickets are $50 each and include a commemorative wine glass. For more information, call 800-443-7778.6. April 30-May 2 – Hospice du Rhone – an exceptional three-day event that is globally regarded as the “single most essential and enjoyable gathering of international Rhône wine producers and enthusiasts.” Attendees expand their knowledge of the 22 Rhône varieties, while rubbing elbows with the winemakers whose passion spurs the inspiration and energy that sets the tone for every seminar, meal and tasting.7. May through October – Art in the Park ­­– On the first Sunday of the month (from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) enjoy 90 local artists, food and music, at the Dinosaur Caves Park. For more information, call 805-704-8128.8. May 15-17 – 27th Annual Paso Robles Wine Festival – This is the marquee tasting event along California’s Central Coast, and it’s a perfect excuse to visit Paso Robles Wine Country. More than 100 area wineries host an array of special events including winemaker dinners, food pairings, seminars, winery tours, special tastings and more.9. June 19-21 – Pismo Beach June Car Show – This is one of the largest and finest classic car and street shows in the area, with over 800 classic automobiles and street rods. For more information, visit thepismobeachclassic.com or call 866-450-7469.10. October 17-18 – 63rd Annual Clam Festival – Get in on the fun in downtown Pismo Beach. There’s a parade on Saturday morning, which kicks off this annual event, followed by a carnival, clam dig, music and food. For more information, call 800-443-7778. POSTCARD FROM PISMO BEACHEATLido Restaurant805-773-8900, thedolphinbay.comNative Restaurant & Lounge805-547-5544, nativelounge.comPelican Point Bar & Restaurant805-773-0000SLEEPDolphin Bay Resort & Spa800-516-0112, thedolphinbay.comCottage Inn by the Sea888-440-8400, cottage-inn.comPismo Beach Hotel805-773-4445, thepismobeachhotel.comPLAYPacific Adventure Tours805-481-9330Extreme Hummer Adventures866-543-6355Avila Beach Golf Resort 805-595-4000 Cypress Ridge Golf Club805-474-7979Patriot Sportfishing805-595-7200The Livery Stable: Horseback Riding805-489-8100

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Fine Art, Fine Folks

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

What comes into some people’s minds when they hear Sun City? Do they imagine elderly men in brightly colored shirts riding in golf carts? Or is it a vision of blue haired ladies wearing lace collars playing bridge? Well think again! If you want to meet people who prove that the saying “50 is the new 30” is true...just hang out with members of The Artists of Timber Creek. “We’re not a bunch of old fogies slapping paint on canvas,” Bobbie Powell, the group’s publicist says. “We are professional artists bringing every media style to life.” More than a decade ago, the Artists of Timber Creek began as the Sun City Art Club with 20 members. It has since grown to 150 members whom join together to learn about art, display their work, and sell art. The group’s talent and experience range from newly interested hobbyists to art professionals with lifelong careers in the field. They all work in concert for the betterment of their art studio and each other’s talent. Several artists offer classes throughout the year and share their specific knowledge for creating landscapes, portraits, still life and more. The studio, located in the elegant Timber Lodge of Roseville’s Sun City, is transformed into a gallery on the first Saturday of every month. These “first Saturday” receptions feature a specific theme or individual artist, and are open to the public. It is the perfect occasion to meet and mingle with local artists, enjoy a glass of wine and see great art. The artists also host their Annual Art Show each spring. Now in its 14th year, the show takes over Sun City’s Ballroom and fills it to the rafters with more than 300 paintings and works of art. The show also includes live music, a wine bar, and opportunity to meet the artists and discuss their work. This year jewelry, greeting cards, and stationary will be available for sale. As in past years, they will also raffle several original pieces. “This show is a collaborative effort and everyone has a part to play,” Dennis Carr, Chairman of the 2009 show says. “It’s a lot of work and a lot of fun.” The group also believes in bringing art into local schools. All proceeds from the raffle, along with a percentage of the art sales, will help to educate kids on the importance of art. “We have been able to raise about $1,200 each year,” Powell says. “It is important to us that we contribute time and money to children’s art education.” William Fatlowitz of Art Talks, located in Roseville, does framing for trade and commercial artists. He has been framing the work created by several of the Timber Creek artists for years, and says that he is quite impressed by the quality of their work. “The work of these artists is very good,” Fatlowitz says. “These pieces hold up next to professional art pieces.”Artists of Timber Creek’s Annual Art Show takes place on Saturday, April 4 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Sunday, April 5 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Sun City Roseville Ballroom. Join the fun and see the art, you won’t be disappointed. For more information, call 916-774-3888. •

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Calling All Cooks!

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

2 cucumbers, sliced2 tbsp. mayonnaise 1 sliced tomato (optional)1/4 cup Bernstein’s cheese and garlic Italian dressingGarlic salt to tasteCucumber Saladby Doreen SpringPeel and slice cucumbers; place in a medium-size bowl. Add dressing and mayonnaise. Stir until well blended. Add garlic salt to taste. Add more dressing or mayonnaise as needed to reach desired taste.Sequoia Old Fashionby Sequoia Restaurant Muddle or Crush the following in a glass:1 sugar cube1 maraschino cherry1/2 orange slice3 dashes of bitters1 ice cubeFill glass with ice. Add 2 ounces of Whiskey. Top with Club Soda, orange slice & cherry garnish.Pineapple Curryby Kelly Carnahan1-2 tbsp. oil1-2 cloves garlic, chopped15 fresh basil leaves, chopped1/4-1/2 tbsp. red curry paste2 cans coconut milk 1 tomato, chopped with skin removed1 large can cubed pineapple, drained4 tbsp. fish sauce2 tsp. brown sugar1/2 lime, squeezed16 prawns, raw (optional)1 lb. chopped chicken, uncooked1 tbsp. Serrano chili, chopped (about 1or 2) In a little oil, sauté garlic and basil until basil is browned. Remove from pan, set aside. Cook curry paste briefly to develop aroma. Add one can of coconut milk, fish sauce, tomatoes, pineapple, lime juice and brown sugar. Stir to combine. Add chicken and stir until cooked. Add prawns and stir until cooked through. Add remaining can of coconut milk, chili peppers and reserved basil/garlic. Serve over Jasmine rice. Add more or less curry paste to spice it up or down.Potato Chip Cookiesby Melissa Woods1 cup butter1/2 cup sugar1/2 cup pecans1 tsp. vanilla1/2 cup crushed potato chips2 cups self-rising flourPreheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix butter, sugar, pecans and vanilla. Add crushed potato chips and flour. Form into small balls and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Press balls with bottom of a glass dipped in sugar. Bake 8-10 minutes.For more of our featured recipes from this month's cover story be sure to pick up this month's copy of FoothillStyle. Click on the "Get Your Copy" link on the bottom of this page for some of our newsstand locations. Or, to order a copy of this issue, please email [email protected], or call 916-988-9888.

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Community Roots

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Having first been incorporated in October of 1928, Roseville Better Gardens Club (RBGC), a nonprofit that recently celebrated its 80th anniversary, is anything but a garden-variety community organization. For its sustained participation in district, club, civic, and conservation activities and projects, RBGC, a member of the Garden Foothills District of California Garden Clubs, Inc., and the National Garden Clubs, Inc., has earned “Blue Ribbon Club” designation.“The purpose of the RBGC is to further the interest of its 54 members in all aspects of home gardening in Roseville and the vicinity,” according to Club Board Members Lori Key, Donna White, Sue Bennett, and Suzanne Wellington, who add that a vital part of the group’s overall mission is “to create, promote, and further interest in horticulture, gardening, floral and landscape design, plant and bird life, and appreciation of the natural beauties of the State of California.” To fulfill this aim, RBGC encourages civic beautification and roadside development; assists in conservation projects; coordinates and centralizes the work of California garden clubs; and cooperates with various agencies on educational matters. Among the Club’s ongoing activities are hosting speakers for monthly group meetings; organizing spring field trips and garden tours; assisting the City of Roseville in planting trees on Arbor Day; fund-raising for Penny Pines, which collects monies in support of California National Forests to purchase seedlings for reforestation; and, together with two other area garden clubs, sponsoring the Annual Roseville Rose Show, which will celebrate 11 years in 2009.On the civic duty front, the Club is equally busy, participating in several community service projects, including Roseville’s annual Maidu Park Clean-Up, maintaining the container gardens at the Blue Line Gallery, and decorating for Senior Dances at the Maidu Reception Hall. The support RBGC has managed to draw for nearly a century begs the obvious question: Why are Roseville and surrounding communities so horticulturally inspired? “Most would agree that it isn’t the soil!” Club Board Members say. “Part of it is in the name, since roses thrive in our area despite the summer heat. We also have a long growing season, and the attractiveness of road medians, parkways, and green belts encourages beautification and conservation of our beautiful oaks.”Ironically, area growth is also part of RBGC’s longevity. Thanks to fundraisers such as RBGC’s Annual Plant and Garden Sale, which is scheduled to take place May 19, at the Maidu Community Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Club continues to thrive, even in difficult economic times. Board members credit this success to members, all of whom appreciate the rewards of fine gardening, and know full well that, after that initial seed of curiosity is planted, there is always more to learn.Meetings are held the third Tuesday of the month, September through June at the Maidu Community Center. All individuals with an interest in home gardening are welcome to join, with the understanding that they will be expected to participate in Club activities, of course! • For more information, visit RBGC online at maiduneighborhoodassociation.com/13.html, or call Lori Key at 916-784-0418.

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Adventures for Active Adults

Feb 28, 2009 ● By Super Admin

Whoever said that youth is wasted on the young had no idea about the joys of travel, adventure and making new friends in “the golden years.”Those joys aren’t lost on senior centers and Parks and Recreation Departments in Placer, El Dorado and Sacramento Counties, however. That’s why they’re arranging all manner of tours and travel options for seniors, ranging from short day trips to overnight and week-long excursions.  “We really try to plan trips we think people would enjoy,” says Tracie Colamartino, community services program assistant for the City of Rocklin. “Moreover, these trips are ideal for people whom might not feel comfortable traveling alone.”The Rocklin group’s next trip is an overnight casino and snow trip, “The Amtrak to Reno,” on March 3 and 4. That’s followed by an excursion to the Flower and Garden Show in San Francisco on March 21, and a day trip to Sonora to see Fiddler on the Roof on April 1. Other trips include the stage show Wicked on April 29 in San Francisco, followed by a return to the City for the “Sculptures and Fountains of San Francisco” in May 16.Trips costs vary depending on the destination and amenities. A typical day trip runs about $80, for example, and includes transportation, admission to an event, lunch and a driver tip.  More information is available at rocklin.ca.us/parks or by calling 916-623-5223. Be sure to get added to the “Trip Interest List” to receive regular notices of upcoming excursions.  Out toward Folsom, El Dorado Hills and Placerville, the senior centers in Folsom and El Dorado Hills organize occasional Tahoe trips. The El Dorado Hills center, for example, has trips to Harrah’s and Harvey’s planned for March 5 and April 2. The cost is only $35, and includes a $20 cash voucher and an $8 food voucher. For details, call 916-358-3575.Beyond those trips, however, the senior centers in Folsom and El Dorado Hills frequently refer seniors to Celeste Cooney, senior activities coordinator at the Placerville Senior center. “We have some wonderful trips coming up, from ‘Petals and Perfume’ in the Dry Creek area to ‘The Treasures of Idaho and Montana,’” Cooney says. “All folks need to do is pack their bags. We take care of the rest.” The rest includes much more than travel and hotel accommodations. Trips also include “escorts” whom come along to help out “if anything comes up,” and detailed itineraries, as well as admissions and meals.  Several upcoming tours are headed to San Francisco, for such events as stage shows (Wicked in March) and special exhibitions (Faberge in April). More information is available by calling Cooney at 530-621-6158, or subscribing to the County’s monthly bulletin, the Senior Times, for just $5 per year.   Finally, although these adventures are designed for and marketed to seniors, they are open to anyone. “If mothers want to bring their daughters or grandchildren  – that’s perfectly okay,” Cooney says, adding with a chuckle, “we never make anyone show their AARP card at the door.”

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